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LT COL  Robert ROSENTHAL

UNIT: 418th BOMB Sqdn POSITION: P

 Lt Col. Robert Rosenthal (Photo courtesy of Ernest Havecker and his family: Eileen Rosenthal and Jodi Womack.) Rosenthal information 

SERIAL #: O-792349 STATUS: CPT
MACR: 12046 CR: 12046

Comments1: 10 OCT 43 MUNSTER (ROYAL FLUSH) AWARDED DSC - Commander 350th & 418th BS

COMMENTS & NOTES

MEMO 1:

CREW:

*** Listed on John P. Ernst MACR (#12046) and Casualty Report -- Flying as Command Pilot.

LT ROBERT "ROSIE"  ROSENTHAL      P LEGENDARY 100TH AIRMAN WHO FLEW 52 MISSIONS (SEE NOTES BELOW)
LT WINIFRED T. "PAPPY" LEWIS    CP CPT MARCH 8, 1944 BERLIN  DFC w/OLC
LT RONALD C. BAILEY                NAV CPT MARCH 8, 1944 BERLIN  DFC w/OLC
LT  CLIFFORD MILBURN               BOM CPT MARCH 8, 1944 BERLIN DFC w/OLC
SGT MICHAEL BOCCUZZI             ROG CPT MARCH 8, 1944 BERLIN  DFC w/OLC
SGT CLARENCE C. HALL               TTE CPT MARCH 8, 1944 BERLIN  DFC w/OLC
SGT RAY H. ROBINSON                BTG CPT MARCH 8, 1944 BERLIN DFC w/OLC
SGT LOREN DARLING                    WG SWA 10 OCT 43 MUNSTER Awarded Silver Star & Purple Heart
SGT JOHN H. SHAFFER                  WG SWA 10 0CT 43 MUNSTER (RETURNED TO STATES) Awarded Silver Star & Purple Heart
SGT WILLIAM DeBLASIO                TG CPT   MARCH 8, 1944 BERLIN * DFC w/OLC  ( SEE NOTE ABOUT MUNSTER MISSION)

Crew arrived 100th Bomb Group September 28, 1943. 418TH SQDN, CREW FLEW ROSIE'S RIVETERS
SGT'S JAMES F. MACK AND M.J. SHELDON REPLACED DARLING AND SCHAFFER.

Lt Col Robert "Rosie" Rosenthal Timeline:

Jan 2 1942- Sept 6, 1942        AAFFS (Army Air Force Flight School) 
                                                Aviation Cadet: Pre-Flight, (Maxwell Field, Alabama-) 
                                                Pilot Training in PT-17-60 hours ( Primary Flying School, Douglas, Georgia 3/42-5/42)
                                                Pilot Training in BT-13-71 hours (BFS-Basic Flying School-Shaw Field, South Carolina-5/42-7/42)
                                                Pilot Training in AT-6-9,17,71 hours (AFS-Advanced Flying School, Moody Field Georgia-7/42-9/42)
Sept 6,1942-Feb 1, 1943        AAB Ft Meyers (Army Air Force Base Fort Meyers Florida)
                                                Pilot AT-6 Gunnery Instructor
Feb 1, 1943-May 1, 1943         AAB Sebring (Army Air Force Base Sebring, Florida)
                                                Student Officer- Transition Training in B-17, 140 hours
May 1, 1943-Jun 1, 1943         19th Bomb Group (H) Pyote, Texas
                                                Pilot B-17 Combat Training 80 hours 
Jun 1, 1943-Aug 15, 1943       19th Bomb Group (H) Dyersburg, Tenn 
                                                Pilot B-17 Combat Training 160 hours
Aug 15, 1943-Sept 15, 1943    Enroute ETOUSAAF (European Theater of Operations, United States Army Air Force)
                                                Pilot B-17-Enroute ETO via Aircraft. Departed US 1 Sept 1943, arrived ETO 6 Sept 43
Sept 28, 1943-Mar 5, 1944      418th BS, 100th BG (H) ETOUSAAF (8AF) [European Theater of Operations, United States Army Air Force
                                                Pilot B-17-300 hours-Flight Commander (1st Pilot), 25 c/m (combat missions) 240  c/hours (combat hours).   
                                                15 Squadron Leads,   5 Element,Leads and 5 Wing Leads. 
Mar 5, 1944-May 24, 1944       HQ 100th BG (H) ETOUSAAF (8AF)
                                                Assistant Group Operations Officer (Lt Col Jack Kidd-Operations Officer). Pilot B-17, Air Leader 5 c/m (combat 
                                                missions, 45 c/hrs (combat hours), 5 Group Leads, Acting Command Pilot
May 24, 1944-Sept 11, 1944   350th BS, 100th BG (H) ETOUSAAF (8AF)
                                                Squadron Commander, 190 hours,  B-17 Air Leader, 17 c/m (combat missions) 120 c/hrs (combat hours), 
                                                5 Group Leads, Acting Command 5 Wing Leads Pilot
Sept 11, 1944-Nov 1, 1944     Hospitalized at 91st General Hospital due to injuries sustained on Sept 10, 1944 mission to Nurnburg with 
                                                Rosenthal as Command Pilot, crash landed in France and sustained a broken arm; internal injuries 

LEAD CREW SEPTEMBER 10, 1944, NURNBURG  PFF A/C 42-97770
 
MAJOR ROBERT "ROSIE" ROSENTHAL   COMMAND PILOT
1ST LT WILLIAM F. TERMINELLO, JR  PILOT
1ST LT MELVIN KODAS                  FORMATION OFFICER/TAIL GUNNER
2ND LT STEWART J. GILLSON         NAVIGATOR
CAPT. WOODROW W. MCGILL           COMMAND NAVIGATOR
LT GREGORY MADDOX                    RADAR OPERATOR
2ND LT FRANK RUBICK                    BOMBARDIER
S/SGT RUSSELL L. HEGER                TOP TURRET ENGINEER
S/SGT LOUIS QUIJADA                    RADIO OPERATOR GUNNER
SGT THOMAS A. PALMER                 WAIST GUNNER
SGT GEORGE J. HARTOS                  WAIST GUNNER  

Nov 1, 1944-Dec 1, 1944        HQ 13th Combat Wing, ETOUSAAF (8AF)
                                                 Combat Wing Training Officer. In charge of all Wing training programs
Dec 1, 1944-Feb 3, 1945        418th BS, 100th BG (H) ETOUSAAF (8AF)
                                                 Squadron Commander, 55 hours, B-17 Air Leader 5 c/m (combat missions) 45 c/hrs (combat hours)
                                                 1 Division Lead (Berlin Feb 3, 1945, shot down, picked up by Russians and returned to England)
                                                 Acting Command 4 Wing Leads, Pilot

Feb 3, 1945   BERLIN          MACR #12046,           A/C#44 8379
(Rosenthal bailed out with this crew. Rescued by Russians - toured Moscow.) Feb 3, 1945 Target: BERLIN
Again attempts to return to Flight Operations - 100th Commander refused - Rosie had to quit flying combat at 52 missions

Maj Robert Rosenthal           Command Pilot     Landed in Russian Lines
Capt John Ernst                        P                  POW
1st Lt Arthur I.Jacobson          CP                  POW  (from Crew of Lt. G. Brown)
1st Lt Stewart J. Gillison      Command NAV     EVA   (from Crew of Lt W. Terminello)
1st Lt Louis C. Chappel           NAV                 KIA     (from Crew of Lt W.J. Wilson)
1st Lt Robert H. Stropp       Radar NAV          Landed in Russian Lines
1st Lt Eugene E. Lockhart     BOM                  KIA   (from the Crew of Lt Oren Hopkins)
T/Sgt Charles H. Webber     ROG                Landed in Russian Lines 
T/Sgt Dugger C. West        TTE                  POW
S/Sgt Warren Winters         WG                  POW
S/Sgt G.A. Windisch            TG                  Landed in Russian Lines

Mar 28, 1945-May 28, 1945    HQ 100th BG (H) ETOUSAAF (8AF)
                                                 Group Training Officer.  Set up policies for training of new crews, very little operational duty. 
May 28, 1945-Jun 7, 1945     Returnee-Returned to USA via aircraft and arrived on Jun 7, 1945, leave, processing, and reassignment
Nov 30, 1945                      Honorably Discharged

RANK:
Sept 6, 1942- Commissioned Aviation Cadet to 2nd Lieutenant  0-792349
Sept 7, 1943- Temp promotion 2nd Lieutenant to 1st Lieutenant 0-792349
Feb.11, 1944- Temp promotion 1st Lieutenant to Captain-0792349
July 16, 1944- Temp promotion from Captain to Major-0-792349
Mar 21, 1945- Temp promotion from Major to Lt Colonel-0-792349


CO OF THE 350TH BS FROM LATE MAY 1944 TO SEPT 10, 1944.
CO OF THE 418TH BS FROM ? TO FEB 3, 1945. 

Awards:
Distinguished Service Cross (for Feb 3, 1945 Berlin Mission)
Sliver Star (Munster, Oct 10, 1943) with Cluster (Oct 3, 1943-Sept 10, 1944),  
Distinguished Flying Cross ( Completion of 25 missions March 8, 1944-Berlin) with Cluster( July 12, 1944 Munich/Aug 5, 1944 Magdeburg )
Purple Heart with cluster ( Sept 10, 1944 Nurnburg and Feb 3, 1945 Berlin-broke the same arm on both occasions)
Air Medal with 7 Oak Leaf Clusters clusters
Distinguished Flying Cross (British)
Croix de Guerre (French).  
ETO Ribbon with 4 Battle Stars (Air Offensive Europe, Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland)
Presidential Unit Citation 
Authorized to wear 3 overseas service bars (each bar represents 6 months of overseas service, Rosie served 21 months overseas)


LIST OF LT ROBERT ROSENTHAL'S 52 MISSIONS (mpf 2001 from Maj Rosenthal himself)

 1.   08/10/43 BREMEN
 2.   09/10/43 MARIENBURG
 3.   10/10/43 MUNSTER
 4. 03/11/43 WILHELMSHAVEN
 5. 07/11/43 DUREN
 6. 13/11/43 BREMEN
 7. 26/11/43 PARIS/BREMEN
 8. 29/11/43 BREMEN
 9. 30/11/43 SOLINGEN
10. 05/12/43 BORDEAUX
11. 24/12/43 NO-BALL
12.  31/12/43 PARIS
13. 21/01/44 NO-BALL
14. 30/01/44 BRUNSWICK
15. 03/02/44 WILHELMSHAVEN
16. 04/02/44 FRANKFURT
17. 05/02/44 VILLACOUBLAY
18. 10/02/44 BRUNSWICK
19. 20/02/44 SETTIN & POSEN
20. 21/02/44 ALHORN
21. 24/02/44 ROSTOCK
22. 25/02/44 REGENSBURG
23. 03/03/44 BERLIN
24.  04/03/44 BERLIN
25. 08/03/44 BERLIN
FINISHED TOUR WITH CREW
26. 25/04/44 DIJON
27. 07/05/44 BERLIN
28. 12/05/44 BRUX, CZECH
29. 19/05/44 BERLIN
30. 30/05/44 TROYES
31. 05/06/44 BOULOGNE
32. 06/06/44 FRENCH COAST-D-DAY
33. 15/06/44 WILSTER
34. 18/06/44 BRUNSBUTTELKOOG
35. 22/06/44 PARIS
36. 06/07/44 NO-BALL
37. 12/07/44 MUNICH
38. 14/07/44 MAQUIS SUPPLY DROP, SOUTHERN FRANCE
39. 18/07/44 KIEL
40. 25/07/44 ST LO, GROUND SUPPORT
41. 02/08/44 LaFERE
42. 05/08/44 MAGDEBURG
43. 13/08/44 NANTES
44. 15/08/44 VENLO
45. 25/08/44 POLITZ
46. 05/09/44 STUTTGART
47. 10/09/44 NURNBURG*
48. 18/12/44 MAINZ
49. 30/12/44 KASSEL
50. 07/01/45 COLOGNE
51. 17/01/45 HAMBURG
52. 03/02/45 BERLIN

*10 SEP 44 THIS CREW WITH ROSENTHAL AS COMMAND PILOT CRASHED LANDED IN FRANCE.
Sustained a broken arm; refused ground job, returned to Flight Operations

LEAD CREW SEPTEMBER 10, 1944, NURNBURG  PFF A/C 42-97770
 
MAJOR ROBERT "ROSIE" ROSENTHAL   COMMAND PILOT
1ST LT WILLIAM F. TERMINELLO, JR  PILOT
1ST LT MELVIN KODAS                  FORMATION OFFICER/TAIL GUNNER
2ND LT STEWART J. GILLSON         NAVIGATOR
CAPT. WOODROW W. MCGILL           COMMAND NAVIGATOR
LT GREGORY MADDOX                    RADAR OPERATOR
2ND LT FRANK RUBICK                    BOMBARDIER
S/SGT RUSSELL L. HEGER                TOP TURRET ENGINEER
S/SGT LOUIS QUIJADA                    RADIO OPERATOR GUNNER
SGT THOMAS A. PALMER                 WAIST GUNNER
SGT GEORGE J. HARTOS                  WAIST GUNNER   
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
(Rosenthal bailed out with this crew. Rescued by Russians - toured Moscow.) Feb 3, 1945 Target: BERLIN
Again attempts to return to Flight Operations - 100th Commander refused - Rosie had to quit at 52 missions

 Feb 3, 1945   BERLIN          MACR #12046,           A/C#44 8379

Maj Robert Rosenthal        Command Pilot     Landed in Russian Lines
Capt John Ernst                        P                POW
1st Lt Arthur I.Jacobson          CP                POW  (from Crew of Lt. G. Brown)
1st Lt Stewart J. Gillison   Command NAV       EVA   (from Crew of Lt W. Terminello)
1st Lt Louis C. Chappel            NAV               KIA     (from Crew of Lt W.J. Wilson)
1st Lt Robert H. Stropp       Radar NAV          Landed in Russian Lines
1st Lt Eugene E. Lockhart       BOM                KIA   (from the Crew of Lt Oren Hopkins)
T/Sgt Charles H. Webber         ROG                Landed in Russian Lines 
T/Sgt Dugger C. West            TTE                 POW
S/Sgt Warren Winters             WG                  POW
S/Sgt G.A. Windisch                TG                  Landed in Russian Lines
Ernst's leg amputated  in German Hospital night of 3/2/45 & he was soon exchanged.

See "CONTRAILS" p.131 & S.O.C. p.95. Also p.219/223 of "FLYING FORTRESS" by E.Jablonski.

EYEWITNESS REPORT from MACR #12046   "A/C #44 8379 was hit by flak,reported to be a ground 
rocket a few seconds before bombs away. A/C continued on run and dropped bombs.  Fire and 
dense white smoke was seen in the fuselage and bomb bay, including the cockpit.  Bomb bay 
doors closed and then reopened.  Pilot opened his window and peeled gently off to the 
right,  directing deputy leader to take over on VHF.   A/C headed NE and flew level for a few 
moments while six members bailed out (3 appeared to come from waist or tail and 3 from 
bomb bay..There was a small explosion in #3 engine nacelle and thd A/C headed down, burning 
and beginning to spin when last seen at 15/000 feet.  Observers believe entire crew had an 
excellent chance to bail out."


Robert Rosenthal is the best known of the 100th veterans and one of the better known airman in WWII. Fresh out of law school he enlisted in the U.S.Army, December 8th, 1941. Progressed rapidly through the Army Aviation pipe line and joined the 100th as a 1st pilot in August 1943, coming at the onset of some of the 100th more famous missions. "Rosie", as he is known to all 100th veterans, started with the 100th Oct 8, 1943 trip to Bremen. The 100th lost seven B-17s including the 351st's  Thomas Murphy in the famed Piccadily Lily. On the ninth of October, 43 the 100th went on the long mission to Marienburg and returned with no losses.

On the 10th of October, 1943, "Rosie" and the 100th went to Munster. Only the Royal Flush with Rosenthal and his crew returned to Thorpe Abbotts. This mission as much as any other established the character of the 100th. There is a charismatic quality, earned many times over, about the 100th. No other Group is remembered with the reverence commonly accorded them.  Robert Rosenthal, the 100th's beloved Rosie, earned a large part of this reverence..A Painting of the Royal Flush coming home is displayed at the American Military Cemetery, Cambridge, England.  ..pw


  On p.257 in the book "B-17s Over Berlin" {Hawkins}, Edward Pachnik {CP of 335 Sqd, 95thBG] describes his mission to Cottbus on 15 Feb 1945. His A/C was damaged by flak over the target and they also flew west to the Russian lines and landed.  Eventually on the 25 Feb 45 the crew was flown to Moscow and that evening was hosted to a farewell dinner in a large banquet hall. About 11 PM they were escorted to the American Embassy and greeted by Averell Harriman, the American Ambassador. Then the next day they saw Rosenthal and I quote--
    "The next day we met Robert 'Rosie' Rosenthal of the 'Bloody Hundredth' Bomb Group. His right arm was in a sling due to being fractured in his bail out while flying his last mission." "Rosie had flown 50 missions with the 100th Bomb Group since arriving at Thrope Abbotts in October 1943."
    "The following day, our crew, with Rosie Rosenthal, travelled by train to Poltava where we were delayed about a week. From Poltova we flew in a C-46 transport plane to Iran, where we stopped overnight." "Next morning we flew to Cairo, Egypt.  After three days in Cairo, we flew to El Adane, a British base, then to Athens, Greece; Naples, Italy, and Rome where we transferred into Winston Churchill's converted B-24 Liberator for the flight back to St Mawgan's, near Lands End in Southwest England. A US Navy DC-3 then flew us to Bovington Airfield. Here we were stranded until we found an abandoned B-17G parked out of sight in the back woods. Its serial number was 43-38346;  we flew this airplane back to the 95th Bomb Group at Horham two days later."

****************************************************************************************************************

*Letter sent to Robert “Rosie” Rosenthal on March 17, 2001 by Bill DeBlasio, tail gunner on Rosie’s Crew with his recollections of the MUNSTER mission October 10, 1943.  

Rosie,
        I did the best I could considering this fading memory of mine.  Some parts of this mission stand out very clear to me, others such as where we were in the formation draw a blank.  I haven’t had a “flash back” for about 7 years now, maybe they are behind me. I certainly hope so.  They are a truly miserable 24 hours.  I’ll close for now; I hope this is what you want.  My Family has been trying for years to get me to write about this.  I simply didn’t feel I could do it. 
                                                  Bill


We arrived in England in September 1943 and were soon sent to the 100th Bomb Group, which was located near a small town named “Diss”.  We flew our 1st mission to Bremen, our second to Marienburg, our third to Munster on the 8th, 9th, and 10th of October 1943. The 100th Bomb GP launched 13 aircraft this day and I do not recall what position in the group formation we were assigned.  As yet, we were not assigned our own aircraft.  Therefore we flew the one assigned to us; Royal Flush. If my memory serves me correctly, the briefing officer stated we were to bomb as much of the center of the city as possible.  The theory behind this was; if the civilians were killed who would man the equipment to help fight the war.  Seemed sound at the time.  

                                          Air Battle

The Group as a whole ran into considerable flak but the fighters were much more of a threat by far then the flak.  It has been said in numerous books that the Munster Mission was one of the hardest fought battles for both sides of the entire war and I for one am inclined to agree!  Twelve of the Groups aircraft were shot down either before bombs away or shortly thereafter, leaving the Royal Flush all by herself.  I believe at one time we tried to attach our selves to the 95th Bomb GP for protection, however this did not last for long.  Flak had knocked out one of the left engines as well as one on the right wing making it impossible to keep up with any formation.

Once we were completely alone the fighters really started their attacks. I think at this time I should say what follows are through the tail gunners eyes as I was far to busy to look around.  The fighters were very well coordinated and were coming in waves of four abreast.  There were not firing until approximately 800 yards and neither was I.  I lined up on the number two man form my left and fired three short bursts. His left wing flew off over his plane and crashed into the plane to the outside.  Both went down on fire.  I then switched to their inside plane on the right and fired at him.  Smoke started coming from the plane and the canopy came off, the plane rolled over ejecting the pilot.  I couldn’t follow his plight as I had one more plane to deal with.  Just as I brought my sights to bear on him, he peeled off to his left (my right).

There was a period of about 4 or 5 minutes respite then they started again. I believe we may have been about 15 thousand feet as two Ju-88’s joined the fray, with two engines out there was no way we could maintain high altitude.  Again there were 4 FW 190’s, only this time they were staggered more or less one behind the other, not in a straight line as were the first bunch. This time however the two Ju-88’s were on each end of the4 fighters making six aircraft lined up on us. For some unknown reason, I decided to try for the bigger aircraft first.  I thought I noticed something hanging from the bottom of their aircraft.  About that time, here come the rockets.  A total of 8 rockets come at us in about 1 minute of time, all missed.  It dawned on me that what I saw beneath the aircraft were their flaps. They needed to lower their flaps to give them a more stable platform for their rockets.   

I started firing at the Ju-88 on the left and soon he was on fire and sliding off on his right wing.  The other aircraft had closed too within 600 yds and I just started raking my fire from left to right and back again.  During this exchange two of the FW-190’s in the center crashed into each other, as I believe I hit them both at the same time.  So we have a total of six planes shot down and we don’t know how many, if any, were damaged.  About this time I believe you ordered me to fire off my remaining ammo and come out of the tail position.  At this time we were below 10,000 ft and did not know if we were going to ditch or not.  We began throwing anything that wasn’t nailed down out to lighten the aircraft.  We were successful and didn’t ditch.  

After searching in bad weather conditions for our field, we finally found it and landed safely.  I remember sitting on the grass and vomiting for what seemed like an eternity.  I was asked to secure my guns, which I did.  I do not recall whether any of us put in claims for downed aircraft, as this was superficial compared to losing the entire Group except on plane.  Besides, it wouldn’t have done any good as we all knew any aircraft shot down had to be verified by at least one or two aircraft other than your own.  I remember your going in the ambulance with John Shaffer (waist gunner). A few days later we were sent to the flak house for R&R.  What an absolutely lovely house and grounds and the locals could not have done more to make our stay more pleasant

(Bill DeBlasio gave me a copy of this letter to Rosie and asked me that his account of the Munster mission not be posted while he was still with us. Bill left us 8/12/2001, not long after sharing these memories.   He was a humble man, not searching for medals or recognition but wanted his Family to know what hell he had seen from his tail gun position. He was simply doing his job that day protecting his fellow crewmembers and aircraft from the onslaught of German fighters. He did that job above and beyond the call of duty.  I thought it only appropriate that 60 years after that mission, his story be told.   The nightmares are now over for Bill, and we wish him eternal rest and our sincere gratitude….Michael Faley-100th Bomb Group Photo Archives and Historian)   
************************************************************************************************************

MISSIONS OF SGT JAMES F. MACK (MPF 2002)

 1.  03/11/43 WILHELMSHAVEN
 2. 07/11/43 DUREN
 3. 13/11/43 BREMEN
 4. 26/11/43 PARIS/BREMEN
 5. 29/11/43 BREMEN
 6. 30/11/43 SOLINGEN
 7. 05/12/43 BORDEAUX
 8. 24/12/45 NO-BALL
 9.  31/12/43 PARIS
10. 21/01/44 NO-BALL
11. 30/01/44 BRUNSWICK
12. 03/02/44 WILHELMSHAVEN
13. 04/02/44 FRANKFURT
14. 05/02/44 VILLACOUBLAY/PARIS
15. 10/02/44 BRUNSWICK
16. 20/02/44 SETTIN & POSEN
17. 21/02/44 BRUNSWICK/ALHORN
18. 24/02/44 ROSTOCK
19. 25/02/44 REGENSBURG
20.  03/03/44 BERLIN
21. 04/03/44 BERLIN
22. 08/03/44 BERLIN (ROSIES CREW FINISHES)
23. 22/03/44 BERLIN (FLEW WITH LT FERBRACHE)
24. 01/04/44 LUDWIGSHAVEN (RECALLED, FLEW WITH LT CHUCK HARRIS)
25. 08/04/44 QUACKENBRUCK, AF (FLEW WITH LT CHUCK HARRIS)
      09/04/44 POSEN & MARIENBURG (RECALLED, FLEW WITH LT C. HARRIS)
26. 19/04/44 LIPPSTADT & WERL AF (FLEW WITH LT FORSYTHE CREW)
27. 20/04/44 MARQUENVILLE

Diary of S/Sgt. Jim Mack, sn# 17155954  (mpf 2002)

Date of Induction: November 10, 1942
Serial Number of Revolver: 567215

May 30, 1943 Left U.S. from New Yourk on Queen Mary. Very confussing and very dissappointed because I had no Furlough
                        the boat was very crowded. 22,000 men on board

June 4, 1943 Queen Mary docked at Fytle of Clyde, 18 Miles from Glasgow, Scottland.

June 6, 1943 Arrived at 13th RCD in Northern England along with 85 more gunners, we were all sent to different bomb groups
                          eventually.

July 16, 1943 Arrived at 100th Bomb Group with 15 other Gunners.

Oct. 10, 1943 MUNSTER!!! Rosies Riveters return alone.  Luck was really with them. Every other ship was shot down.

Nov 3, 1943 Wilhelmshaven, Ger. 6:55 to 12:55. Heavy flak. First mission since Munster.  Plenty scared

Nov 7, 1943 Duren, Germany, Little Flak , 48 degrees below zero

Nov 12, 1943 Practice Mission over North Atlantic

Nov 13, 1943 Bremen, Got this book today, just got back from mission to Bremen. Group behing us caught hell from fighters
                        flak very heavy and accurate.

Nov 26, 1943 Paris, France.  Very little flak, clouds over target.

Nov 29, 1943 Bremen, Ger. (second time) 7:45am-4:47pm.  No ships lost.

Nov 30, 1943 Solingen, Ger. 8:15am-2:30pm  -60 degrees. Oxygen system froze.  Mike and Junior passed out.

Dec 5, 1943 Bordeaux, France. 10 hrs in the air.

Dec 24, 1943 NO-BALL flew a new ship (504).  Bombed the secret coast (rocket planes)

Dec 31, 1943 Paris, France  Ship hit with flak, bombed airfield 

Jan 21, 1944 NO-BALL Rocket coast again  12:05-15:10. heavy flak, hit four times. We got prepared for crash landing
          came in O.K. thank god.

Jan 30, 1944 Brunswick, Ger. Bombed through clouds  4:30am-3:00pm

Feb 3, 1944 Wilhelmshaven, Ger. Accurate flak.  We did violent evasive action 7:35am-2:30pm

Feb 4, 1944 Frankfurt, Ger. 8:05am-3:45pm  We had flak from the coast into target. Very nerve wracking.
  Crossed Ruhr Valley, 3 holes in ship.  2 ships fell out of formation and were shot down by FW 190's.

Feb 5, 1944 Paris, France  Airport, hit the target

Feb 10, 1944 Brunswick, Ger.  6:45-4:10. Heavy Fighter oppostion 30 FW's, 20 JU88's 2 Forts blew up when hit.
                       Saw 15 forts go down.

Feb 20, 1944 Stettin & Posen (no note)

Feb 21, 1944 Brunswick & Alhorn Ger. 9:35-3:30. Good fighter support. Lost a fort over Holland.

Feb 24, 1944 Rostock, Aircraft factory in Poland 8:00-7:30. very tired when I got back. Attacked by 6 Ju88's

Feb 25, 1944 Regensburg, Ger.  8:15-6:15 demolished target (aircraft factory) saw the Alps & Danube River.
  (pretty country) lost 3 forts, 12 F.W.

Feb 26, 1944  Notre:  of the 15 gunners that came to the 100th BG only 3 of us are left. Charles Mabey(finished up), 
  Bill McClelland(wounded)and Me still hanging around. Of the 85 of us to come over, there is now 15 left.  
  6 have finished.  I'm still sweating them out.  7 more missions left to make.

Mar 3, 1944 Target: BERLIN  when I saw the target on the map my morale hit a new low. We were called back
  when within 40 miles of Berlin. 2 forts collided & blew up at 27,000 feet.

Mar 4, 1944 BERLIN again.  I really sweat this one out. We were recalled when we got over France (whew)

Mar 8, 1944 BERLIN, 11hrs in the air. This time we made it. Flak terrible, the fighters hit us after we left
  Holland. It was a very rough trip, our ship shot down 3 fighters that were making an attack. It
  was the last mission for my Crew and when we landed there was much rejoicing. We "Buzzed"
  the field twice at tree top level.

Mar 22, 1944 BERLIN, I flew with a different crew (Ferbrache). It was the hardest mission I was ever on. We
  flew right over the center of the city. The flak was awful. We were hit several times.  24 holes in the 
  ship and some control cables were cut. The bomb bay doors wouldn't close and I crawled out in the
  bomb bay with the engineer and tried to crank them closed. The wind just about blew us both out of the
  ship.

Apr 1, 1944 Ludwigshaven, Ger. We started out and were recalled when we were 30 miles in France. Dropped bombs
  in the channel, flew with (Lt Harris) a good man.

Apr 8. 1944 Quackenbruck, Ger, Target an airfield. Mild Flak, No fighters, hit the target (note: Believe that S/Sgt Mack
  flew with the crew of Lt Chuck Harris on this mission,,,mpf)

Apr 9, 1944 Posen, flew with Harris again.  Started for Poland & were called back. Couldn't land because of fog.

Apr 19, 1944 Lippstadt & Werl, Ger,  Target an airfield.  Flew with Forsythe, darn good Crew. 

Apr 20, 1944 Marquenville & Flottemanville. Last Mission, secret target in France, flak heavy and accurate. No 1 engine
  was hit. Thank god I've finished.

THE END!  
.


Subj: Re: Rosie's Missions.  
Date: 7/30/2002 8:22:29 PM Pacific Daylight Time 
From: jsruss@mindspring.com 
To: MPFaley@aol.com 
Sent from the Internet (Details) 
 


Hi Mike,

I was looking over Rosie's missions and I'm  curious about something.  I'm 
specifically interested in the Mission that was written about in Stars and 
Stripes in July 1944.  From everything I've gathered he was flying as 
Command pilot with Kincannon and they lost both #1 and #2 engines after 
snapping the prop off of #1.  They nursed their aircraft to England and 
landed with only one prop still turning.  This was written about in "Flying 
Fortress" by Jablonski also.  I'd narrowed it down to either May 7th or May 
24th.  In my emails with Ray Bowden he states:

"As with so much of the history of 100BG the available records are confusing
as regard to the mission date for Rosenthal/Kincannon's dramatic return from
Berlin. It could have been either 7th or 24th May but on balance of the
evidence I have found I believe the date to have been 24th May. Records show
that Rosenthal flew on both 7th May and 24th May missions to Berlin.
Available records confirm that Kincannon definitely flew with him on 24th
May in #564. Although Kincannon flew on 7th May I have found no evidence
that it was with 100BG or with Rosenthal (however this does not mean that he
did not but simply that I have found no evidence of it yet - others may have
further info). The a/c in which Rosenthal and Kincannon flew on 24th May is
confirmed as being #564 whereas the a/c Rosenthal commanded on 7th May is
simply recorded as "PFF #2". I have found no loading lists for either date
which yield and confirm the full crew list on either flight.
I did have some correspondence and discussion with Kincannon's bombardier
Robert Nance who provided a pathfinder mission list for Kincannon's crew but
this was not his official USAAF documentation and therefore is subject to
query on some dates. He drew my attention to the "Yank" story but was unsure
of the actual date of the incident -- however, he thought it was late May.
Commenting that the reason none of the crew were named was due to
Rosenthal's insistence. His mother apparently had been told
by him that he had finished flying and only had a ground job.
The crew flew their first 4
pathfinder lead missions to Berlin - 7th, 8th, 19th and 24th May. I feel
sure that if this incident had occurred on his first lead mission he would
have recalled it as such. A first mission must lodge significantly in one's
memory I would have thought. Of the twenty lead roles the crew flew I have
so far been able to confirm their a/c as being 42-97564 on ten of them --
the first confirmed flight being on 19th May (Berlin)."

I was also in contact with Joe Redden who was a Crew Chief in the 375th FG 
(It was P-47s from this group that escorted Rosie's plane).  He stated
"I cannot say with any certainty the date on which Maj. Keppler provided
escort for the crippled Fort, but from records available to me I would
say that the date was may 7, 1944. My reason for discounting a later date
in May rests on the fact that after May 8, 1944, all MACR for the 361st
do not list a P-47. That indicates to me that the Group's transition from
P-47s to P-51s was completed by May 8, 1944. Keppler's flight were
probably flying P-47s on May 7th/"

Now in the list of Rosie's missions that you sent to me he did NOT fly on 
May 24th.  Ray Bowden states that he did and with the Kincannon crew.

I'd appreciate your opinion on when this mission took place and which crew 
Rosie was flying with.  I realize that this is a relatively minor thing, 
but I'm very curious and would appreciate your assistance.

Thanks!

Joel

Based on the 357th Fighter Group info and Rosie's own list of Missions
I would have to say the Berlin mission on May 7, 1944 is the date this 
took place.  Those two items are overwhelming without actual loading list
information to the contrary.

Regards,
Michael Faley
100th Bomb Group Photo Archives
100th Bomb Group Historian

**************************************************************************************************************
Robert (Bob) "Rosie"  Rosenthal    
ROSENTHAL--Robert (Bob), beloved husband of Phillis (Heller), devoted father of Peggy, Steven (Barbara), and Dan (Paula), loving grandfather of Joshua (Julie), Katie, Joanna, and Sam, adoring great-grandfather of Alexi and Madeleine. A retired lawyer and highly decorated WWII B-17 pilot. Died April 20, 2007. Services 2PM Thursday at Community Synagogue of Rye. Interment Sharon Gardens Cemetery, Valhalla, NY. Donations may be made to UJA or White Plains Hospital. 
Published in the New York Times on 4/25/2007.
**************************************************************************************************************
REPLY TO: sboas7@hotmail.com
SUBMITTER: Susan Boas
EMAIL: sboas7@hotmail.com
PURPOSE: Report a death (TAPS)
INTEREST: I am the veteran's relative
  
VETERAN: Robert Rosenthal
DATE OF DEATH: 04/20/2007 
FAMILY CONTACT: Peggy Rosenthal
161 West 86th Street,Apt 7B
New York, New York 10024 
  
OLD ADDRESS: 
NEW ADDRESS: 
TELEPHONE NUMBER: 
  
MESSAGE: My Uncle Bob passed away last week. I wasn't sure if anyone notified you.

MEMO 2:

COMMANDER 350TH & 418TH BS (MEDAL CITATIONS)

Lt Col Robert “Rosie” Rosenthals Awards Citations:

Distinguished Service Cross:  24 May 1945

“For extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy on 3 February 1945 while serving as Air commander of a Heavy Bombardment Divisions formation attacking the Templehof Marshalling Yards, Berlin, Germany.  On this date, while on the bombing run, his aircraft suffered a direct hit by enemy-aircraft fire which inflicted severe damage on the plane and started and intense fire in the bomb bays.  Completely disregarding his personal safety and in spite of the imminent danger of explosion, he continued to lead his formation over the target.  The extraordinary heroism, skillful airmanship, and intense determination to complete his assigned mission displayed by Lt. Col. Rosenthal on this occasion are in keeping with the highest tradition of the Armed Forces of the United States. 

Silver Star:  3 January 1944
 Headquarters, 8th Air Force, General Orders No. 1 (1944)
First Lieutenant, Army Air Forces, United States Army.  For gallantry in action while serving as Pilot of a B-17 airplane on a bombing mission over Germany 10 October 1943.  Prior to reaching the objective, one engine of his aircraft was knocked out and other serious damage sustained during vicious assaults by enemy fighters.  Thought subjected to constant attack and intense anti-aircraft fire, Lieutenant Rosenthal continued on to the target and bombed and bombed it successfully. When unable to remain with the formation on leaving the target area, his aircraft became the object of concentrated attacks by enemy planes.  Another engine was knocked out, the oxygen system almost completely destroyed, the wing badly damaged and two gunner seriously wounded. Maneuvering his crippled aircraft with great skill, Lieutenant Rosenthal fought his way back to England and made a safe landing.  The gallantry, tenacity of purpose and flying skill displayed by Lieutenant Rosenthal on this occasion reflect highest credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States.  

Silver Star, Oak Leaf Cluster: 16 November 1944
Headquarters, 8th Air Force, General Orders No. 520 (1944)
For gallantry in action while piloting heavy bombers over enemy territory from 3 October 1943 to 10 September 1944.  As, Combat Pilot and later at various times, Lead Pilot for his Squadron, Group and Combat Wing.  Major Rosenthal completed an unusually large number of hazardous missions.  On 10 September 1944, while over Germany enemy ground fire knocked out two engines and heavily damaged his aircraft.  Alone and unescorted, he skillfully maneuvered his battered plane back to friendly territory, where he made a successful crash landing.  In the face of determined opposition, Major Rosenthal’s complete disregard for personnel safety, devotion to duty and combat skill have been a constant source of inspiration to all flying with him. 


Distinguished Flying Cross: 9 March 1944

For extraordinary achievement while serving as Pilot of a B-17 airplane on Twenty-five heavy bombardment missions over enemy occupied Europe. Through the skillful handling of his aircraft in aerial combat.  Captain Rosenthal has materially, aided in the success of each of these twenty-five missions, among which were the operations over Brunswick, Germany 21 Feb 1944, Regensburg, Germany 25 Feb 1944, and Berlin, Germany 8 Mar 1944.  The courage, coolness and skill displayed by Capt Rosenthal on all these occasions reflect the highest credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States. 

Distinguished Flying Cross, Oak Leaf Cluster:  29 Sept. 1944

For extraordinary achievement while serving as commander in the air of group and wing formation on heavy bombardment missions against the enemy.  In surmounting the obstacles of intense anti-aircraft fire on both occasions Major Rosenthal demonstrated outstanding airmanship in commanding his formation on successful attacks against Munich 12 July 1944 and Magdeburg, Germany, 5 August 1944.  Major Rosenthal’s forceful leadership and flying ability materially aided in the successful completion of these important missions.  His actions reflect the highest credit upon himself and the Armed forces of the United States.  

Purple Heart: 1 Oct. 1944

For wounds received in Action in ETO on 10 September 1944

Purple Heart, Oak Leaf Cluster:  15 Mar 1945

For wounds received in Action in ETO on 3 Feb 1945 

Air Medal: 27 November 1943

Under the provisions of Army Regulation 600-45, 8 August 1932, as amended and pursuant to authority contained in Section I, Circular 36 HQ ETOUSA, 5 April 1943, and teletype S1632C HQ VIII Bomber Command, 26 September 1943, the Air Medal is awarded to the following-named officer. 
Citation:  For exceptionally meritorious achievement, while participating in five separate bomber combat missions over enemy occupied Continental Europe. The courage, coolness and skill displayed by this officer upon these occasions reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States. 
Robert (NMI) Rosenthal, 0-792349, 1st Lieutenant, 100th Bombardment Group (H), Army Air Forces, United States Army.   

Air Medal Oak Leaf Clusters

23 December 1943 for 5 missions
21 February 1944 for 5 missions
28 February 1944 for 5 missions
14 June1944 for 5 missions
20 July 1944 for 5 missions
 21 August 1944 for 5 missions
  3 January 1945 for 5 missions

French Croix de Guerre: 29 January1945
                Campaigns for the Liberation of France 
                        (June-December 1944)
                         Cecison No 341

The General De Gaulle, President of the Provisional Government of the France 
Cite a l’Ordre DU CORPS D’ARMEE: Maj Robert Rosenthal 0792349 3d Bomb Div
Pour services exceptionnels de Guerre rendus au cours des operatons de Liberations de la France”

Cette Citation comporte l’ attribution de la Croix de Guerre avec Etiolie de Vermeil
Paris, le 29 Janvier 1945 
Signe: de GAULLE


British Distinguished Flying Cross:  16 April 1946

Subject: British Decoration
To:       Lieutenant Colonel Robert Rosenthal

1. The War Department is in receipt of confirmation of the award to you of the Distinguished Flying Cross by the British Government. 
2. Acceptance of this award has been approved and the approval made a matter of record in the War Department.  
3. This Office has been informed that the British authorities are making arrangement for all decorations which were not presented in the field to be presented at a future date in an official and ceremonial manner.  You will be informed of the date and place of the ceremony. 

                                         BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR:  

                                                                      A.L. Hilliard
                                                                   Adjutant General

KIA / MIA / EVA / INT INFORMATION:

TARGET: DATE:  
AIRCRAFT: CAUSE:  

BURIAL INFORMATION

PLOT: ROW:  
GRAVE: CEMETERY:  

PHOTOS:

 Robert "Rosie" Rosenthals original 418th crew. Rosie led all 100th aviators with 52 missions. Standing L-R: L. F. Darling, M. V. Bocuzzi, J. F. Mack, C.C. Hall, W. J. DeBlasio, and R. H. Robinson. Kneeling: R. C. Bailey, Rosie (pilot), C. J. Milborn, W. T. Lewis Detailed Information (100th Photo Archives) 

 Robert "Rosie" Rosenthal Crew taken March 8, 1944 after completion of Tour.  The UNK person standing on left is Lt Anthony J. Busalacchi-Navigator.  Detailed Information (100th Photo Archives) 

 "Rosie's Crew / Thorpe Abbotts 1943" by Gil Cohen 

 "Rosie" Rosenthal with his air and ground crews. The Crew Chief, second from left standing is Joe Woodard - believed to have been the largest airman in the 100th. Detailed Information (100th Photo Archives) 

 Robert "Rosie" Rosenthal crew Detailed Information (100th Photo Archives) 

 Robert Rosenthal crew Stateside Detailed Information (100th Photo Archives) 

 Jim Mack from Rosies Crew. (Photo courtesy of Ernie Havecker and his family: Eileen Rosenthal and Jodi Womack.) 

"Rosie's Crew/Thorpe Abbotts 1943"  painting by Gil Cohen

Display at Palm springs Air Museum

  Gil Cohen (aviation artist) and Robert Rosenthal with "Rosie's Crew/Thorpe Abbotts 1943" painting. (100th Photo Archives) 

 Robert "Rosie" Rosenthal near the end of his first tour. Detailed Information (100th Photo Archives) 

 2nd Lt. Robert Rosenthal's 1942 Identification card. 

 A tribute to Robert Rosenthal (100th Photo Archives) 

Lt. Robert (Rosie) Rosenthal after Sept 10, 1944 mission. Detailed Information (100th Photo Archives)

Part 1 article about Robert Rosie Rosenthal alive and well in Russia. (Courtesy of Matt Mabe)

Part II. (Courtesy of Matt Mabe) 

Another Story of Rosenthal Family receiving news Rosie is OK (Courtesy of Matt Mabe)

Newspaper Clipping of Silver Star Award for Munster. Another Story of Rosenthal Family receiving news Rosie is OK (Courtesy of Matt Mabe)

AGO card for Nurnburg War Crimes

back of AGO card for Nurnburg War Crimes 

Robert Rosenthal at Nurnburg War Crimes Trial . 

Jack Kidd leaving the 100th. From left: Sammy Barr, Thomas Jeffrey, Kidd, Rosie Rosenthal and Sumner Reeder. The airman with back to camera is not identified.   (100th Photo Archives)

From left: "Rosie" (Rosenthal), Frederick Sutterlin, and Harry Crosby. (100th Photo Archives)

From left: Butch Revengo, Jack Kidd and Rosie. This is the day Kidd left the 100th. (Gen Kidd collection)

Jack Kidd leaving the 100th - From left: Sammy Barr, Rosie, Thomas Jeffrey, Kidd, and Sumner Reeder. (Gen Kidd collection)

100th Officers photographed at Thorpe Abbotts in 1944. Standing third from left is Harry H. Crosby, Joseph "Big Joe" Armanini, Everett Blakeley. Seated from left: Sammy Barr, John Bennett and Rosie. (Robert Rosenthal) (100th Photo Archives)

Second from left: Marvin Bowman, Rosie Rosenthal, Tim McMahon and Bill Cook. The others are unknown. (100th Photo Archives)

 Gale "Bucky" Cleven and Robert "Rosie" Rosenthal at the 100th Salt Lake City, Utah reunion. (Photo Courtesy of Cindy Goodman) 

 Thomas Jeffrey, Rick Erickson, Dave Tallichet, Robert "Rosie" Rosenthal, Charlie "Hong Kong" Wilson. 

Robert Rosenthal getting into cockpit, Gerald Putnam on wing

Robert Rosenthal in cockpit Gerald Putnam 2nd from left on wing 

Gerald Putnam 3rd from Left Robert Rosenthal 2nd from Left

Robert Rosenthal 1st from Right Gerald Putnam 2nd from Right

Robert Rosenthal 1st kneeling Gerald Putnam 2nd from left kneeling

Robert Rosenthal 2nd from Left Gerald Putnam 4th from left 

 John B. "Jack" Kidd, right, leaving the 100th in August 1944 - Rosie Rosenthal with back to camera and Maj Sumner Reeder is in the middle (100th Photo Archives) 

 Jack Kidd's departure from the 100th. Kidd Collection 

 Jack Kidd's departure from the 100th. Kidd Collection 

 Jack Kidd's departure from the 100th. Kidd Collection 

 Jack Kidd's departure from the 100th. Kidd Collection 

 Group gathers around a man playing a guitar. The officer in the center (from left) are Al Paul, Bob Tienken, and Rosie Rosenthal. (Photo courtesy of Brooks Buford) 

This PFF was flown by Robert Rosenthal and featured in the July 44 Yank Magazine Article. Date of Mission is May 7, 1944 and target was BERLIN.  

 Thorpe Abbotts - Woodrow "Woodie" McGill driving and wearing Rosie's hat, front passenger Jim Douglas, back from left Saul Levitt, who would win a Pulitzer Prize after the war, Harry Crosby and hatless the legendary Robert "Rosie" Rosenthal. (100th Photo Archives) 

PFF flown by Maj Robert Rosenthal on May 7 1944

Article about Family receiving DFC w/OLC and Air Medal with OLC's of Capt. Kincannon. This article also proves the date of the May 7, 1944 as the Mission to Berlin with Rosie Rosenthal as Command Pilot and the problems with the flak and prop coming off. (Courtesy of Matt Mabe)  

48379 EP-J on take off Roll.  Aircraft Rosie and John Ernst Crew flew on Feb 3, 1945 mission to Berlin

Left to right: Capt Douglas (Group Bombardier), Lt. Ken Welty (Nav), Lt Col John Bennett (349th CO and Air Exe) Col Neil B. "Chick" Harding (Group CO), Maj John B. "Jack" Kidd 351st CO and Group Operations), Maj Harry Crosby (Group Navigator), Lt Robert "Rosie" Rosenthal 

100th A Group Strike Photo for Berlin Mission Feb 3, 1945 from Capt Douglas Eden.  Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire
Looks Like WILSON flew the A-Sqdn 975 Z  HS 27  drop photo ship...Jack O'Leary

100th B Group Strike Photo for Berlin Mission Feb 3, 1945 from Capt Douglas Eden.  Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire
 WALLISH was flying the B-Sqdn drop photo 613  HS 9

100th "C" Group Strike Photo for Berlin Mission Feb 3, 1945 from Capt Douglas Eden.  Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire
Thats Lyman Fillinggame flying LITTLE SWEETHEART---KLEEN SWEEP in the C-Sqdn bomb drop photo 532 G  HS # 15 ... Jack O'Leary

At the 1986 100th Bomb Group Reunion at Thorpe Abbotts.  The top picture features the veterans in the control tower. My Father is at the left; Robert Rosenthal is sixth from the right. Harry Crosby is in the center with the beard pointing towards the distance...Raul Freitas

Royal Flush on Hardstand 47.  Photo courtesy of Eileen Potts Smith.  

Royal Flush having GP bombs loaded on Hardstand 47.  Photo courtesy of Eileen Potts Smith

Rosie's Riveters II on Hardstand 43.  In background is Messie Bessie X  238175. LD-O. Photo believed to be taken March 8, 1944 after Capt Robert Rosenthal's Crew returned from BERLIN to complete their tour of 25 Missions.  Photo Courtesy of Eileen Potts.  

 

SERVED IN:

Crew 1

Crew 2

Crew 2

ID: 4475