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LT  Dale R. MCEWEN

UNIT: 350th BOMB Sqdn POSITION: CP
SERIAL #: STATUS: CPT
MACR:

Comments1: 7 AUG 44 BEAUTOR

COMMENTS & NOTES

MEMO 1:

CREW

LT JAMES B. NOBLE                     P POW 28 JUL 44 MERSEBURG
LT DALE R. McEWEN                  CP CPT   7 AUG 44 CLAMECY-JOIGNY
F/O ALEXANDER MARUCHESS    NAV RFS   14 JUL 44 O-2045261       RUSSIAN SPEAKER & INTERPRETER FOR MAGEE FULLER ON 1ST RUSSIAN SHUTTLE, 
                                                                                                  NEVER MADE IT, ACCIDENT ON RUNWAY. 
LT DERRY D. IRONS                 BOM RFS  14 JUL 44  O-757522
T/SGT RUSSELL F. ELLIS          ROG POW 28 JUL 44 MERSEBURG
T/SGT FRANK CRUZ                 TTE POW 28 JUL 44 MERSEBURG
S/SGT CHARLES J. SLAGHT       BTG CPT 11 AUG 44 VILLACOUBLAY, AF
S/SGT ARTHUR L. ROBERTS       WG KIA   28 JUL 44 MERSEBURG
S/SGT FREDERICK F. SWARTZ    WG POW 28 JUL 44 MERSEBURG
S/SGT WILLIAM P. McNALLY       TG KIA   28 JUL 44 MERSEBURG

350th Sqdn..  Crew, as above, listed on Combat Crew Roster of 8 May 1944; 


DATE:     LAST_NAME:  FIRST_NAME:  RANK:  POSITION:            TARGET:         CREW_NBR:         PLANE_NBR:
4/9/1944         NOBLE         J.B.         LT         P         KRZESINKI (POSEN)                18                    97534
4/10/1944       NOBLE         J.B.         LT         P         RHEIMS/ CHAMPAGNE              18                   97534
4/11/1944       NOBLE         J.B.         LT         P         POSEN / ROSTOCK T.O.           18                   31049
4/12/1944       NOBLE         J.B.         LT         P         SCHEUDITZ (RECALL)               18                   97534
4/13/1944       NOBLE         J.B.         LT         P         AUGSBURG                              18                                 
5/1/1944         NOBLE         J.B.         LT         P         SAARGUEMINES/WIZERNES       18                  31049
5/7/1944         NOBLE         J.B.         LT         P         BERLIN                                   18                  31049
5/8/1944         NOBLE         J.B.         LT         P         BERLIN & LaGLACERIE              18                  31049
5/12/1944       NOBLE         J.B.         LT         P         BRUX, OIL REFINERY                18                  37800
5/13/1944       NOBLE         J.B.         LT         P         OSNABRUCK                            18                  32009
5/19/1944       NOBLE         J.B.         LT         P         BERLIN                                    18                 31903
5/20/1944       NOBLE         J.B.         LT         P         BRUSSELS                                18                 31903
5/24/1944       NOBLE         J.B.         LT         P         BERLIN                                    18                 31903
5/25/1944       NOBLE         J.B.         LT         P         BRUSSELS                                18                 31903
6/2/1944         NOBLE         J.B.         LT         P         BOULOGNE                              18                 6089
6/6/1944         NOBLE         J.B.         LT         P         FALAISE/OUISTREHAM              18                 6089
6/6/1944         NOBLE         J.B.         LT         P         FALAISE/OUISTREHAM              38               107233
6/12/1944       NOBLE         J.B.         LT         P         ROSIERES & DUNKIRK                18                  6089
7/6/1944         NOBLE         J.B.         LT         CP       FLEURY/CREPEUIL                     PFF                

on the MERSEBURG mission of 28 Jul 44 the crew flew as a pathfinder with the following crew component...

CREW                                                            
DATE: 28 July 1944          350th Sqdn            A/C#42-97555 Pathfinder
MISSION: Merseburg                                     MACR#7880,Micro-fiche#2890

Capt Floyd H.Mason (349th Ops Officer)  COM P  POW
1st Lt James B.Noble                             P       POW
2nd Lt Robert P.Lipps                           CP       POW
1st Lt Edmund J.Kaufman              RAD/NAV     POW
1st Lt Robert W.Barry                         NAV      POW (WIA)
2nd Lt Marcus M.Hertz                        BOM     POW
 T/Sgt Frank Cruz,Jr.                          TTE      POW
 T/Sgt Russell F.Ellis                           ROG      POW
 S/Sgt Arthur L.Roberts                     RWG      KIA
 S/Sgt William P.McNally                      TG       KIA
 S/Sgt Frederick F.Swartz                   LWG     POW

Of the above,Noble, Cruz, Ellis, Roberts, McNally,and Swartz appear to be from the
original Noble crew. Lipps was from the M.C.Rumley crew. Kaufman from the R.A.
Wegrzynek crew.Barry from the H.E.Bethea crew.  Mason had joined the 100th with
his own crew on 28/11/43 and may have been on his 2nd tour.

Eyewitness Report: " At 0850 hours near 5043N-0802E,A/C #555 nosed down twice
and the group followed.Then the wheels were lowered and fire was seen in the
radio room. Looked as if it might be a flare fire. The A/C peeled off to the
right.A small explosion was seen in the right wing between #3 engine and the
fuselage. Ono man bailed out before the A/C left the formation. The others
followed. Nine chutes were seen to open and the tenth had not opened when the man
disappoared into the undercast. The fire in the A/C appeared to be out when it
plunged into the undercast flying steadily under AFCE control."

On 4/3/46 Capt.Robert W.Barry gave the following statement:

SUBJECT:Casualty Information of Crew Members.
       · . . . .
a. Activities before leaving aircraft: - Captain Mason was the first crew member
to leave the A/C via a front exit.He departed with his harness on, but not
fastened,and his parachute in his left hand,approxlmately 2 1/2 minutes after the
explosion.
Sgt.Roberts,who was the engineer and top turret gunner and not the right waist
gunner(as shown on questionaire),had not left at time of my departure;however,
according to informatlon as given to me by the bombardier,at a subsequent date,
there was no one left in front end of the ship when he left. It can be therefore
assumed that Sgt.Roberts suceeded in bailing out.
Sgt.McNally,being a waist gunner,would bail out via the rear exits. All communi-
cation with the back of the ship had gone dead at the time of the explosion.I
have no way of stating whether this crew member ever left the ship from personal
knowledge.However,from information received from Capt.E.J.Kaufman,Radar Navigator,
McNally bailed out at about the same time as he did.

LT DALE McEWEN BECAME 1S PILOT OF THIS CREW SOMETIME AFTER THEIR 10TH MISSION.  

2ND LT ROBERT A. WEGRZYNEK         P RFS ILLNESS
2ND LT CHARLES J. GUTEKUNST       CP NOC
2ND LT EDMUND J. KAUFMAN         NAV POW    28 JUL 44  MERSEBURG, OIL REFINERY (WITH F.H.MASON CREW)
2ND LT JACK . EPPENDORF            BOM KIA      11 SEP 44  RUHLAND, OIL REFINERY
S/SGT GEORGE W. WRIGHT           TTE NOC
S/SGT JAY V. EMRICH                   ROG NOC TAPS: 1988
SGT DALE E. STRAUSBAUGH          BTG NOC
SGT ESWIN J. TYRRELL                  WG NOC
SGT LUTHER A. WISE, JR.              WG NOC
SGT RINALDO J. BUSSINO               TG CPT 24 JUL 44 ST LO GROUND SUPPORT

350TH SQDN....CREW, AS ABOVE, JOINED THE 100TH ON 09 MAR 1944..

"FLEW FIRST MISSION ON APRIL 11, 1944.  AFTER 10 MISSIONS, LT ROBERT WEGRZYNEK WAS GROUNDED BY A SERIOUS ILLNESS THAT REQUIRED A LONG PERIOD OF RECUPERATION IN A STATESIDE MILITARY HOSPITAL.  WHILE SERVING IN COMBAT, HIS B-17 CREW WAS UNITED IN THEIR BELIEF THAT BOB WAS AN OUTSTANDING LEADER AND EXCEPTIONAL PILOT".....2ND LT CHARLES GUTEKUNST IN LETTER DATED DEC. 2000 mpf

LT DALE R. McEWEN TOOK OVER THIS CREW AS FIRST PILOT.  LT KAUFMAN WAS REPLCED ON THE CREW BY FLIGHT OFFICER ALEXANDER MARUCHESS BOTH MCEWEN AND MARUCHESS WERE FROM LT JAMES NOBLE CREW.  PROABLY MOST OF THIS CREW COMPLETED TOURS.

Note:
Michael:  Dale McEwen and I, both co-Pilots, lost our Pilots about the same time. I was in the 350th Sq.and Dale was in the 418th. They
transferred me to the 418th and as Dale had started his checkout as Pilot. I flew as Co-Pilot for him. He was about 6 missions ahead of me.
Jack Eppendorf our 350th Sq Bombardier and Ed Kauffman our Navigator, both on the original Wegrzynek crew, did not transfer to the 418th with me. Jack flew with another crew and was killed. Ed Kauffman went to 8th AF HQ, became a Radar Navigator. He returned and was shot down with Noble Crew on his first flight as a Mickey Navigator. He was a POW. 
 
Insofar as I recall, Dale and I were a "Put together on the spot" crew. Spare Navigators and Bombardiers, those that were available at the time were assigned to fly with us, Except for Lt Ivons and  Lt Maruchess who were originally in the 350th, Lt Ivons was hurt from flack on the mission when Col. Kelly went down (April 28, 1944 to Sottevast). Maruchess was hurt in a B-17 collision and I never saw either one again. I don't recall the names of any otherBombardiers or Navigators. I flew my last 6 missions with various, new crews. I just don't recall Lt.  Anderson and I'm positive Bussino, the Tail Gunner who flew all of his 29 missions with me would not recall him. I'm Sorry I can't be more helpful
 
Chuck Gutekunst


FLIGHT RECORD 
RINALDO J. BUSSINO 39550304
350TH SQDN.. 100TH BOMBARDMENT GROUP (H)
THORPE ABBOTTS, ENGLAND (STA # 139)

DATE   TARGET        FLT, TIME

5 APR 1944  LOCAL AREA      2:40
9 APR 1944  AIR SEA  RESCUE     4:30
11 APR 1944  POSEN, AC & ROSTOCK, CITY    11:30
12 APR 1944  SCHKEUDITZ, AC FACTORY (RECALL)   3:30
18 APR 1944  GENSHAGEN (BERLIN) AC ENGINES   8:15
19 APR 1944  LIPPSTADT & WERL AF'S    6:45
20 APR 1944  MARQUENVILLE & FLOTTEMANVILLE-HAGUE  5:00
24 APR 1944  FRIEDRICHSHAFEN, AC FACTORY   9:15
28 APR 1944  SOTTEVAST (NOBALL)     5:30
29 APR 1944  BERLIN, CITY      9:30
1 MAY 1944  SAARGUEMINES, MY & WIZERNES (NOBALL  7:15
3 MAY 1944  LOCAL AREA      4:30
4 MAY 1944  ABORT       2:00
7 MAY 1944  LOCAL AREA      1:00
10 MAY 1944  FALLERSLEBEN, MOTOR TRANSP. (RECALL)  3:30
11 MAY 1944  LIEGE, MY      5:00
17 MAY 1944  LOCAL AREA      1:30
19 MAY 1944  BERLIN, CITY (RECALL)     2:10
20 MAY 1944  LOCAL AREA      2:30
22 MAY 1944  LOCAL AREA      3:20
23 MAY 1944  TROYES, AF      8:00
24 MAY 1944  BERLIN, CITY (SPARE; NO HOLES TO FILL)  3:30
28 MAY 1944  LOCAL AREA      2:30
31 MAY 1944  OSNABRUCK, MY     8:30
2 JUN 1944  BOULOGNE & PARIS, RAILWAY JUNCTION  4:10
3 JUN 1944  LOCAL AREA      3:00
5 JUN 1944  ABBEVILLE & BOULOGNE    5:30
6 JUN 1944  OUISTREHAM, TOWN     6:30
6 JUN 1944  FALAISE, TOWN     7:30
7 JUN 1944  NANTES, BRIDGE     7:50
10 JUN 1944  MORLAIX, AF      5:30
15 JUN 1944  LOCAL AREA      1:30
20 JUN 1944  FALLERSLEBEN, MT FACTORY    7:00
7 JUL 1944  MERSEBURG & BOHLEN, OIL REFS   3:20
8 JUL 1944  CLAMECY-JOIGNY, RAILWAY BRIDGE   5:30
10 JUL 1944  LOCAL AREA      5:20
11 JUL 1944  MUNICH, AERO ENGINES    10:20
12 JUL 1944  MUNICH, INDUSTRIAL AREA    9:20
13 JUL 1944  MUNICH, JET ENGINES     8:20
17 JUL 1944  AUXERRE, RAIL BRIDGE     7:45
18 JUL 1944  KIEL, HEMMINGSTADT, OIL (100TH "B")   7:10
19 JUL 1944  SCHWEINFURT & DUREN    7:00
20 JUL 1944  MERSEBURG, OIL REFINERY    8:10
21 JUL 1944  REGENSBURG & LUDWIGSHAFEN   7:30
24 JUL 1944  ST. LO, GROUND SUPPORT    6:15
6 AUG 1944  LOCAL AREA      1:00
6 AUG 1944  LOCAL AREA      1:30
7 AUG 1944  LOCAL AREA      2:00

LT DALE R. McEWEN CREW 5/8/44 (APPEARS TO BE A PICK-UP CREW)

LT DALE R. McEWEN  P (FROM LT J.B. NOBLE CREW)
LT CHARLES J. GUTEKUNST CP (FROM LT R.A. WEGRZYNEK CREW)
F/O DAYTON W. CAFFERTY NAV (FROM LT GEORGE P. FORY CREW)
LT OSCAR F.  MILLS  BOM (FROM LT E. F. NEU CREW)
T/SGT JAY V. EMRICH  ROG (FROM LT R. A. WEGRZYNEK CREW)
T/SGT ALEXANDER L. HUBIAK    TTE (FROM LT HARRY HEMPY CREW)
S/SGT DALE STRAUSBAUGH BTG (FROM LT R.A. WEGRZYNEK CREW)
S/SGT EDWIN J. TYRRELL WG (FROM LT R.A. WEGRZYNEK CREW)
S/SGT DONALD W. HARRIS TG (FROM LT H.E. BETHEA CREW)


****************************************************************************************************************************
Subj: Re: 42-97555  
Date: 12/18/2001 8:20:47 AM Pacific Standard Time 
From: cbfw190@nexgo.de 
To: MPFaley@aol.com 
Sent from the Internet (Details) 
 
Dear Michael,
 
First thing I could tell you is, that 42-97555 crahsed on the ground, which belongs to the small town of OFFDILLN. This is a small town in the direct vincinity of the city of HAIGER. If you have a map, you should look 45 Miles NORTH of Frankfurt / Main.
If you are interested in a larger topographical map of this area, let me know !!
Two things I could add, without any look into the casefile of 42-97555 :
 
1.) James B. Noble, was captured near the town of GUNTERSDORF, which is ca. 4 Miles South West of HERBORN and ca. 14 Miles South South West of the crash site.
 
2.) Marcus M. Hertz was captured near the town of HOLZHAUSEN, which is ca. 8 Miles WEST of the crash site. I believe, that he was at least 1 day "on the run" before he was caught.

3.)1st Lt. Robert W. BARRY did came down by chute directly in the town of WEIDELBACH. He landed on a wooden roof of a small barn in the town. He got injured on his breast and his arms by bailing out. The mass of Germans crowded together and get him from the roof. Some of the Germans were armed and shout to shoot him, but the mass of the people decided to safe his live and to bring him to a hospital. Barry was brought to the house of the major, whos name was Mr. Hof. Here, Reihard BECKER, gave him medical treatment. Thereb were at least 2 young girls in German Red Cross uniforms around him. Later on that day, he was put on a cow-drawn-vehicle and brought to Ewersbach rail road station. From here, he moved by train to Herborn, where he staied in the Miltary Hospital until 17th October 1944.

 Again, many, many thanks for the photo and do not wait, if you have any question.
 
Sincerely
 
Claudio BECKER

son of S/Sgt McNally
NEW ADDRESS: William P. McNally
485 Saddle River Rd. Unit 11
Saddle Brook, N.J. 07663  
TELEPHONE NUMBER: 201-843-0998
******************************************************************************************************

Staff/Sgt. Charles J. Slaght  BTG on Lt Noble Crew and Tail gunner on Lt Paul Jones Crew

1,    April 10, 1944  Reims, France
       Light flak 10 or 15 FW-190’s Saw Eiffel tower In Paris

2.    April 11, 1944 Rostock, Ger.
       Flew North Sea –Denmark
       One hell of a  battle – Un-counted ME 210’s and FW – 190’s 
        in and out of targets. Saw so many Forts go down in flames  that I never 
        thought I would see England again. Crew claimed 5 enemy fighters. Plenty
        of accurate flak. Ship hit in several places. Navigators face scratched by 
        piece of flak. God was flying with us. No fighter support Spent 12 hours 
        in the air and will never forget it.

3.     April 12 – 1944. Got into enemy territory and mission was recalled – Got 
        credit for it. Saw some flak.

4.     April 19 – 1944 Lippstadt
        Moderate flak., Perfect fighter Support

5.     April 20, 1944. Cherbourg, France
         No ball target. Very accurate flak –Ship hit in many places. Waist (sic) door
         hinges shot completely off.. Found out that no-ball targets aren’t easy either
         P38 protection.

6.      April 24 – 1944. Friedrichshafen
         Flack along the way and at target – 10 hour flt. Fair fighter support – Saw
         Lake Constance, Swiss Alps. Planned to head for Switzerland  if hit too bad.
         Some of the boys from other groups did.

7.      April 25, 1944  Brunschweig, Germany –
         Plenty of accurate flak – Good fighter support

8.      May 1, 1944. Sarrequemines. Marshalling yards.
         Light flak. M.E. 109’s made a couple of passes, Plenty of dog  
         Fights and saw a few fighters go down.  Blasted hell out of that target.

9.      May 7, 1944. Today we hit the big one-Berlin. 
         I wasn’t too anxious to go there but now that it’s over I’m glad we did. Damned 
         good fighter support most of the way. Terrific barrage of Flak at target. Lost
         two ships. The boys flying next to us got back but had a direct hit on the nose
         which blew the Navigator’s head off. The poor guy only had two missions to go.
         We hit the target so there’s (sic) probably plenty of dead Germans to make up for 
         our losses.

10.    May 12, 1944. Brux – Checho –
         Another long assed run.  Knowing it’s hard for fighter escorts to go in that far I
         thought for sure we were going to do lot of fighting in and out of the target.
         We were just lucky as the group that went in ahead of us had shit knocked out 
         of them by fighters . We saw a few pass us but they must have been low on gas and 
         ammunition as they didn’t dare come within range. We got hit by something new
         today. Just outside Frankfurt I saw a terrific explosion off our nose. It was identified 
        as a belly tank from a fighter exploding but then I saw a number of parachutes from   
        above but no ships going down. We discovered they were shooting some kind of
         rockets up in front of us. When they got so high a parachute burst open with some  
         kind of a large bomb. They were supposed to drift through our formations and   
         explode.  We lost a couple ships. Those explosions were terrific and I’m glad
         they missed us. Visibility at the target was perfect and we really made a mess of   
         them. It  was a gigantic oil plant.  I saw columns of smoke come up as high as
         10 to 15 thousand feet after we left the target. Twenty more to go. I hope we get a 
          couple short ones now.

11,    May 13, 1944 (Osnabruck) Marshalling yards
         Got the target plus damaging steel works bordering the target Medium Flak.
         Good fighter support.

12.     May 19 – 1944  Berlin
         After scrubbing these easy runs to France they finally sent us into the blue  
         again.  Guess where. That’s right, Berlin. Hot target – The flak was more accurate 
         than it ever was. The first bursts I saw were a few feet from our nose and I wasn’t
         the only one who didn’t think we would make it through. This time our route out 
         was up through Rostock as that was a secondary target if we didn’t hit Berlin. None  
        of our crew liked that as we never forgot our second mission which was Rostock and
        they knocked the shit out of us. We passed over Rostock and headed over the Baltic  
        Sea and I thought we got through. Then we saw red flak to our left and just as I 
        Thought it was a signal to the Luftwaffe. We had fighter protection all day until then 
        And those bastards came in so fast they we(re) half way before anybody called   
        them. They took our right wing man with them on their first pass and right then I 
       knew we were going to fight our way out.  They took a hell of a lot of B-17s that day
       but they made one mistake. After finishing nose attacks they turned right around and
       came in on the tail. Making those turns they were duck soup. A pair of them came
       past and they made their turn Mac picked one and I picked one. Mac got his. I scored 
       hits on mine and then he settled on a straggler low on our right. Nobody on that ship
       was at their guns as they were getting set to abandon ship. He was my meat and I
       gave him everything I had.  Parts of his tail blew off, His engine began to smoke. 
       Then I must have hit the cockpit as there was a big flash there. It must have been an
       incendiary. Then he pulled off and went down in a spin smoking. I got a fighter the 
       first time I went to Rostock and so did Mac but we didn’t get credit for them. If they 
       don’t give us credit this time  I’ll sure raise hell. We paid for that mission but so did 
       the Luftwaffe. I think they’ll stay away from our tail guns now.

13.   May 20, 1944  We weren’t finished until 10:30 last night and they got us up at 
        two today.  We were the only crew to go out of the barracks and we were sweating
        12-B today. It was an airfield In France but the clouds were solid and we      
        couldn’t bomb.Caught moderate flak in and out but no fighters.That was a nice 
        way to get 12-B. 17 to go  (I think the Date is wrong here, should be May 23, 1944
         where the group was recalled from Troyes France,  target Air Field…..MPF)

14.    May 24, 1944. Well it was Berlin again today and what I swear it was worse than 
         our other Berlins and Rostock together. Bad weather messed up our formation just 
         as we hit Germany. We saw about 50 fighters flying along side of us so far out they
         couldn’t be recognized.  After flying there for about 10 minutes all of sudden they
        attacked enmass and went right  through us. They knocked the shit out of us on that
        first pass. Then they turned around and began passing at the tail in threes and fours. 
        By the time we hit Berlin we were one of three ships in our squadron that reached  
        the target.  The lead ship screwed up and after we got out of the flak at Berlin he
       took us right back through it and again the formation was all over the sky. We
        were sitting out there all alone trying to catch up to our lead ship but he was too fast 
       for us.  Flak got him. Then we got some more attacks and again we got the shit  
       knocked out of us again. I don’t know where the hell our escort was. When we got  
       back we checked up and found we had lost four crews out of our squadron and one 
       was in our barracks. We missed those guys more than all the rest we lost. They only 
       had a couple more missions to go.  I claimed two today, Mac four, Swartz two. I
       hope we get credit for them because we really went through hell today. I never
      want to see another mission like that.

15.  June 2, 1944 Today we hit Boulogne gun emplacements It was a milk run and
       I’m glad of it as it was our first mission as lead and I didn’t want to see  things get
       screwed up.  It  was also the first tactical mission in which B-17s hit the invasion
       coast.  We caught some flak but no fighters.  I wish we could get a few more runs
        like that.

16. 

17.

18.    June 12, 1944 Today we got #18.  The Luftwaffe has brought about 500 single 
          engine fighters up and are probably going to use them on the beachhead and us. We 
          were out to get one of the air fields where a lot of these fighters are supposed to be.
          We could not bomb as the target was overcast so on the way out we were looking  
          for targets of opportunity but evidently they didn’t see anything worth bombing. It
           looked like we had a milk run as I could see the English coast ahead just beyond
          the French coast.  I don’t know whether it was the lead navigators fault or not
          but he brought us out right over Dunkirk. I looked down and I could see those Flak 
         guns spitting fire long before we got There so I knew what to expect. Those gunners 
          were really good and they blasted hell out of us. Two  planes went down and 
             exploded a couple thousand feet below us and another one ditched.  I 
              saw some chutes come out of one ship and then I saw something I 
             never thought I would see the Jerries do.  As soon as those chutes
             got low enough to reach with 20 mm’s they shot those guys in their chutes. A
             couple chutes caught fire and went down.  I know now that the Germans are 
             getting desperate because of the invasion,  and I know what to ex-
             pect if I ever go down.

19.   July 7, 1944. Today after a nice long rest I got off the ground again. I didn’t 
        Know who I was flying with until I got to the briefing and found I was flying  
        With Taggart’s crew (Lt Paul Jones Crew). I might go on as their permanent tail 
         gunner.  We went to Leipzig1080 bombers all went around the same area.  It 
        was my first mission as a tail gunner and I could see all the groups following us
      . We were one of the first groups in and as far as I could see there was nothing but 
         bombers. It sure  was a nice sight and I knew Jerry was sure going to catch hell 
         today. We weren’t bothered much until we started on our home run and then 
        they really gave us hell with flak. Quite a few were shot out of formation but 
        they all madeit back. Flak was bursting so close under our belly that we could 
        hear the explosions. There was a dozen holes all through that tail but none of 
        them could find Billy. I saw so many different targets being hit in that section of
              Germany that I couldn’t count them all. Ours was war oil refineries and we 
               really hit it.Black smoke came up as high as 15,000 ft. and I could still
              see it over an hour after we left the target.  That was some sight and I’m only  
               sorry I didn’t have my camera along. I only saw a couple fighters and some  
              P51s  took care of them.It was an 8 ½ hour run so I’m pretty tired now. I hope
              we get a couple short ones now.

20.       July 8, 1944.  Today weather prevented us going to our target so we hit a target of
            opportunity. It was a railroad at Laigle, France.We hit it good and it ended up
            a good mission.  No flak, no fighters Good deal.

21.      July 11, 1944. Primary target was a jet propelled aircraft plant at Munich. Had
           to bomb industrial area in center of city by pathfinder. My old crew was in
           the pathfinder ship. The flak was terrific and we were hit in a few places. It
           was 9½ hours in the air. We had damn good fighter support but we didn’t hit
           any fighters.  One of the other groups caught them.  I’d hate to go there again.

22.       July12, 1944.Well today was the same damn target as yesterday (Munich),  Again
            we had to bomb path finder because of cloud coverage. Today it was pretty bad.
            For a while I didn’t think we were going to get back. Before we got to the target
            our super chargers went bad and we had to fall out of formation. I was scared 
            shitless. Instead of getting rid of the bombs we were over the target alone and
            we caught all kinds of flak. They shot out No. 4 engine and punctured our
            outboard gas tank. We lost a lot of gas before we got it all transferred and
            that made our chances for getting back harder. Over  V.H.F. I could             
 hear quite a few other ships taking off for Switzerland and that’s where 
           I thought we would end up. I could see the Alps and it was really a tempta-
           tion.  The leader sent some fighters back to protect us and one leader
          came up and  sat under our right wing and talked to us over V.H.F. for awhile.
           That P-51 was really pretty and that boy had18 swastikas on his fuselage. He
           couldn’t stay with us long but he said he would be around if we needed him. We 
           really sweated that one out . We got back on two engines but were back and 
           that’s what counts

23.      July 13, 1944   Munich again.
           That did it.  I’m getting to know that place as well as London. Again they shot hell 
           out of us but again we made it back in one piece. That was the closest I ever saw  
           those rockets come.  Some more crews went to Switzerland again. Sometimes I   
           wish we had have gone yesterday too. Maybe they’ll lay off that place for awhile.

24.      July 14, 1944.Today we went on a secret mission way in France. We dropped arms 
           and ammunition to some fighting French. They had three  fires burning in a field  
           so we could spot them. That was the best one I’ve been on so far. The only time  
           we were at Altitude was when we were over the coast. then we dropped down to  
           low altitude all the way over France. I really got a nice view of France from that 
           tail.At the target we dropped down to 500 ft. and I could see French soldiers and 
          girls waiving (sic) at us. One girl was throwing her dress up in the air. The chutes 
          were all colors and they really made a nice sight. Then we passed over the target 
          again to get a good look at where the chutes hit.  They all went right in the field. 
          Good mission.  No flak or fighters. Fighter support getting better every day.

25.      July 17th, 1944. Auxerre, France
          Today would have been one of my best raids if only I had have had some sleep  
           before we went. I kept dozing off and I beating my brains out trying to stay awake
          as we were right in the heart of German fighter territory. We hit the bridge derrick  
          and also wiped out the railroad marshalling yards. It was an important target as 
          three railroads converged there but for some reason they had not moved any flak
          guns around the target.  We caught very little flak and I only saw one ship get a 
          direct hit. The Lufftwaffe also must have taken the day off. Today made 25. Now I
           have to do ten for Doolittle.

26.      July 18th, 1944. Today I flew In place of another sick tail gunner.We hit oil refin-
          eries North (sic) of Kiel, Germany.It was a damn nice mission. The target was
          completely overcast so to me it was just a long joy ride over the North Sea. We
          caught some flak and a couple ships were hit. None went down.No fighters and
          our support was fair.


27.      July 24, 1944. Target was enemy troops on the front line at St. Lo, France.
           We were to open the way for a big infantry drive. The target was  overcast so we
           couldn’t drop our bombs for fear of hitting our own troops.  A B-24
          got a direct hit and blew into a thousand pieces off to our right. Anything can 
          happen even on a milk run.

28.     July 25, 1944. Target was  troops on the Front line at St. Lo, France.
         Today the weather was better and the bombing results were good. I
          like to go on  those missions. We lost a ship today but I saw the full crew bail
          out. This was our first mission with a nine man crew.

29.     July 28, 1944.Target was oil refineries at Merseberg, Germany.
          The flak was heavy at the target but it would have been a milk run except for 
         one thing.  I saw Jim Noble and the rest of old crew go down in flames.  When I got
         back Mac was waiting for me and he was crying like a baby. I could hardly hold
        the tears back myself.  I didn’t even go to interrogation. Mac and I went to the 
         barrack to talk things over. I only hope they all got out. Today we also lost a 
         crew with two best men on it. One was Inskeep (BTG from Lt Stansbury Crew) He
          graduated with Taggert and I.

30.      July 29, 1944 Today we hit the  same target as yesterday. Today we really wiped
            those refineries out.  For over an hour after we left the target I could  still see  
           black smoke from those refineries coming up. Groups  that hit the target after us 
            passed through it at 25,000 ft.  We were really lucky to get through that flak as it 
            was worse than I ever saw before even at Berlin.I had five holes right by my head  
          --I don’t know how it missed me. This was my D.F.C. mission. We lost six ships
           today.They were attacked by jet propelled fighters.

31.      July 31, 1944. Munich.
           Today we hit the jet propelled aircraft factory The flak was plenty rough 
           and accurate. We had about a dozen holes and naturally half of them had to be in 
           the tail section. We were lucky enough to miss fighters as they knocked hell out of   
           the boys around us. I only hope this luck can holdout a few more missions.

32.      August 5, 1944. Magdeburg-Krupp works providing tanks.
          We had pretty clear weather so we did a damn good job on that target. I saw at
          least half dozen other targets hit in the same area. There were bandits around 
          us in and out of  the target. They got a couple passes in on the boys in 
          front of us but then our fighters happened thru and there were countless dog-fights  
          going on all the time and I saw quite a few fighters go down.We lost five ships   
          ourselves One B-17 blew up right off our tail from a direct hit in the bombay. They 
           went down in a solid sheet of flames. I saw one chute come out.  Lady luck
           was flying with us again. Three more to go

MEMO 2:

KIA / MIA / EVA / INT INFORMATION:

TARGET: DATE:  
AIRCRAFT: CAUSE:  

BURIAL INFORMATION

PLOT: ROW:  
GRAVE: CEMETERY:  
ID: 13455