Database Search

You are in the database section of the website.

Select a record category from RECORDS above. When you have selected a category, you will see search options for that category above the record list. 

Most fields require at least three characters. When you submit your query, the search engine will return all records that contain your search term.

Note that when searching for an aircraft serial number, you must enter the full serial number without the leading "4" and without a dash in the Aircraft SN search field. For example, you would enter 42-37772 as 237772.

The Personnel name field searches both last and first names, so if you enter the search term, "Russ", the search engine will return both Russell Abel and James Russell.

You narrow the search by entering more characters into the search field. For example, "Russ" returns many hits. "Russell" returns fewer hits. The same principle applies to all queries.

The POW and KIA categories are list only and are not searchable.

COL  Thomas S. JEFFREY

UNIT: GRP POSITION: C.O.

Col Thomas Jeffrey, CO from May 1944-Feb 1945

Col Thomas S. Jeffrey, CO of 100th Bomb Group upon return from first Russian Shuttle Mission.

SERIAL #: STATUS: CPT
MACR:

Comments1: GP C.O. 06 MAY 1944 -- 02 FEB 1945

COMMENTS & NOTES

MEMO 1:

CREW
                                                               COL THOMAS S. JEFFREY
                                                   100TH BG C.O. 06 MAY 1944 -- 02 FEB 1945

LEDGENDARY COMMANDER OF THE 100TH DURING IT'S GLORY DAYS; IS CREDITED WITH MAKING THE 100TH ONE OF THE 3RD AIR DIVISION'S OUTSTANDING UNITS.  CONSIDERED BY MANY TO BE ONE OF THE MODELS FOR THE GREGORY PECK CHARACTER IN "TWELVE O'CLOCK HIGH"  (GEN SAVAGE)

REMAINED IN THE USAF AND RETIRED AS A MAJOR GENERAL, ONE OF FIVE MEMBERS OF THE 100TH  TO MAKE GENERAL.  KNOWN TO ALL 100TH VETERANS AS "COL JEFF",  GENERAL JEFFREY IS HELD IN HIGH ESTEEM AND THEY ARE, TO A MAN, PROUD TO HAVE SERVED WITH HIM.

FOR A HISTORY OF TOM JEFFREY WITH THE 390TH BG, GO TO AIRMAN AND SEE FILE MAJ GEN THOMAS JEFFREY (mpf 2002)

FOLLOWING ARE MISSIONS FLOWN BY GEN JEFFREY WHILE WITH THE 390TH PRIOR TO ASSUMING COMMAND IF THE 100TH.

Combat Record of Maj. Gen. Thomas Jeffery (100th Commander May 1944-Feb 1945) while serving with the 390th Bomb Group (H), Station 153, Framlingham.

Maj. Gen. Jeffery was one of the 390th's original crews. The following missions were flown with the  390th and include, date,  pilot, aircraft number (whenever possible) and target.  On these missions Col Jeffery flew as Command Pilot with the 390th Bomb Group

390th Bomb Group (Deputy Group Commander) 
1.	Kiel		7/25/43 (believe Maj Jeffrey flew as observer with 95th BG) 
2.	Victry-En-Artous  8/15/43  Pilot-Lt Geary, AC-Pistol Packin Mama
3.	Stuttgart	9/6/43            Pilot-Lt Geary, AC-Pistol Packin Mama 
4.	Emden	10/2/43         Pilot Lt Geary, AC- Pistol Packin Mama	
5.	Schweinfurt	10/14/43*    Pilot-Lt. R.D. Brown, AC #30338 
6.	Munster	12/22/43      Pilot-Lt Wilson,
7.	Quedix	1/14/44
8.	Frankfurt	2/4/44
9.	Brunswick	2/29/44        Pilot- Lt Piley
10.	Minoyeques	3/19/44        Pilot-Lt Richter, Aircraft  #42-31932
11.	Chateaudun	3/28/44        Pilot-Lt Wade, Aircraft #42-31728
12.	Dijon		4/25/44        Pilot-Lt Engelbrecht,

100th Bomb Group (Col Tom Jeffrey takes over Command on May 7, 1944)
13.	Berlin		5/19/44    PFF    A/C# 683
14.	Abbyville	6/5/44       PFF
15.	Caen                  6/6/44     (D-DAY)
16.	Dresden (Ruhland) 6/21/44 (First Russian Shuttle Mission-Landed at Mirgorod, Russia       
17.	Droboycz	     6/26/44 (First Russian Shuttle Mission) From Russia
18.	Arad		   7/3/44    (First Russian Shuttle Mission) From Russia to Italy
19.	Beziers	      7/5/44    (First Russian Shuttle Mission) From Italy to England
20.	Munich	         7/? /44
21.	St. Lo		7/24/44     A/C #37823
22.	Troyes		8/3/44       PFF
23.	St. Sylvain	8/8/44       A/C #37812
24.	Brest		8/26/44    PFF   (Lead Third Air Division)
25.	Mainz		9/8/44      PFF A/C # 968
26.	Warsaw	     9/18/44    PFF A/C # 696 (Second Russian Shuttle Mission)
27.	Szolnok	     9/19/44    PFF A/C # 696 (Second Russian Shuttle Mission)
      Osnabruck     12/13/44   Recall

*Maj Tom Jeffrey led the 390th on 14 October 1943 mission to Schweinfurt and was awarded the Silver Star the group received its second Presidential Unit Citation.  The 390th received their fist PUC for the mission to Regensburg/Schweinfurt on Aug. 17, 1943.  In addition, the Group established a record for enemy aircraft destroyed by any one group on any one mission by destroying sixty-two at Munster on 10 October 1943.

The 100th Bomb Group received the Presidential Unit Citation for Aug 17, 1943 mission to Regensburg/Schweinfurt and the March 4,6,8, 1944 Missions to Berlin 


According to the mission critique,  On August 8, 1944 the target was German Ground defenses around St Sylvian.  The 100th Bomb Group "A" Group was leading the 13th CBW (Combat Wing)which lead the 3rd Air Division and the 8th Air Force.  The lead Group consisted of 13 aircraft lead by  Col Tom Jeffrey (Commanding Officer of the 100th BG) and Lt Neal P. Scott.  The 100thBG "B" Group also consisted of 13 planes and they were flying Low Group in the 13th CBW.  They lost one aircraft (Lt J.P. Keys) and the Lead plane crash landed behind allied lines.   The 390th Bomb Group flew as High Group in the 13th CBW and the 100th BG provided 3 aircraft for the 390th BG's second element of the lead Squadron.  CAPT FREDRICK  "FEARLESS FREDDY"  CHAPIN FLEW AS LEAD BOM ON 8 AUG 1944 (ST  SYLVAIN), ALWAYS A TOUGH TARGET AND THE 100TH LOST IT LEAD AND DEPUTY LEAD TO FLAK PRIOR TO THE TARGET…..WOUNDED ON THE MISSION TO ST SYLVAIN; RETURNED TO FLIGHT STATUS AND FLEW 32 FOR THE 100TH AND  ONE  WITH A B-24 GROUP; PROBABLY THE ONLY 100TH VETERAN TO FLY A MISSION IN A B-24;


                                                     Major General Thomas S. Jeffrey, Jr.
                                       A Founding Father of the 390th Bombardment Group
                                                                      By
                                               William F. Pennebaker and Marshall B. Shore

The 390th Bombardment Group had its origins at Blythe Army Air Base in the edge of the Sonoran Desert in southern California, a warm weather B-17 combat crew-training site of the 34th Bomb Group. It was activated by General Order 14 issued by Headquarters Second Air Force at Fort George Wright, Spokane, Washington on January 26, 1943. On February 23, Headquarters Army Air Base, Blythe, California transferred a cadre of 124 officers and men from the 34th Bomb Group to the 390th Bomb Group with TD to attend the school of Applied Tactics, Orlando, Florida for a month and report on 1 April to Geiger Field, Spokane, Washington. Major Thomas S. Jeffrey, Jr. was Commanding Officer at Blythe of the 391st Bomb Squadron of the 34th Bomb Group. He and his Group Commander, Lt. Col. Irvine A. ("Bo") Rendle, had been completely immersed during the fall of 1942 in the logistics of placing in operational status the newly completed Blythe facility as a site for phase training of newly organized B-17 combat crews.

The first name on the orders for the cadre of the 390th Bomb Group was Major Jeffrey as Deputy Group Commander. He had been directed by Bo Rendle to pick the best available in the 34th to staff the 390th. Rendle, however, elected not to serve as commanding officer of the new group but instead accepted command of a new B-24 Group, the 392nd, stationed then at Tucson. Shortly after this orders were published appointing Lt. Col. Edgar M. Wittan as commanding officer of the 390th. By this time Jeffrey had selected the key staff and command personnel forming the initial cadre of the 390th.

Lt. Col. Wittan and Major Jeffrey had first met and became fast friends in 1939 when both were stationed in a twin engine B-18 reconnaissance squadron at Langley Field. Jeffrey had graduated from Virginia Military Institute in 1938 with a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical engineering and a reserve commission in the Field Artillery. He was accepted for Army Air Corps flight training at Randolph Field and receiving his wings flew B-18s out of Puerto Rico, then flew B-17Es with the 6th Bomb Group in Guatemala, and then attended Bombardier School at Midland, Texas. His next assignment was with the 34th Bomb Group at Geiger Field, Spokane in 1942.Within two days after receiving orders for the activation of the initial cadre at Blythe, Major Jeffrey contacted the pilot officers in staff and command positions to report for afternoon meetings at the officers club where he briefed them on logistics involved in training air and support personnel and in plans being formulated to staff and equip an operational combat unit for overseas operation. Bill Pennebaker remembers that he concluded each session with a mix of Army Air Corps and other songs, which he personally led with his own guitar accompaniment. He was determined to build team spirit from the top and emphasized that the 390th was to be the best trained heavy bombardment Air Corps unit to be shipped out for duty abroad.

Wittan and Jeffrey comprised a superb command duo to oversee the training of personnel assigned for duty in the 390th. Jeffrey had primary responsibility for aircrew training while Wittan oversaw the logistics of putting the pieces together to keep the planes and crews equipped and operational to carry out their primary mission. On the 1st of April the cadre arrived at Geiger and within the next month received substantially its full complement of air and ground personnel. Within three months they had received their combat aircraft and support equipment. Training at Geiger was compacted and after three months the headquarters personnel and the four squadrons were assigned separate bases in Montana for another month of training.During the training phase of the 390th, Col. Wittan spent two weeks in England to participate in several combat missions to experience what we would expect to encounter when operational there. He and Jeffrey were convinced that diligent, thorough training of all unit personnel was critical in carrying out our mission under combat conditions. Formation flying was emphasized for pilots, but personnel assigned to all other combat crew positions were given the best training possible. Jeffrey and Wittan constantly monitored the scope of our stateside training and communicated almost daily with squadron commanders and others concerning aspects of carefully structured training agendas.

Our combat crew training was concluded with a cross-country formation flight across the United States to Bermuda and back with 35 aircraft and crews. Following a brief leave the crews were cleared for flight across the Atlantic, led by Lt. Col. Jeffrey. After a brief stop at Prestwick, Scotland, the crews proceeded to RAF Station 153 just outside Framlingham (Parham), arriving there on July 18, 1943. Our ground support personnel and equipment and supplies arrived soon after. We flew our first combat mission on August 12, to a target in Bonn, Germany.Until P-51 fighter aircraft became operational in February of 1944 we were particularly vulnerable to attacks of German fighter aircraft during our deeper penetrations, and the loss of 20 of our original 35 crews can be largely attributed to inadequate fighter cover on those missions. German fighters were particularly aggressive during three of our toughest missions - to Regensburg, Munster and Schweinfurt, later referred to as "The Big Three".  

Regensburg was our third mission, only five days after our first. Col. Wittan was the command pilot in the lead plane. We lost six aircraft - two over the target; two ditched in the Mediterranean; one interned in Switzerland; one down near Toulona, France, with its crew taken POW. Our bombing was excellent. The 390th received a Distinguished Unit Citation for its part in a legendary but trying mission.

The second of the Big Three, on October 10, Marshall flew to Munster with the Jim Geary crew in “Pistol Packin' Mama”. The 390th lost eight crews. Our bombs were square on target. Our gunners were credited with 62 enemy aircraft destroyed. The 100th Group in our 13thWing lost ten of its fourteen aircraft over the target, while the Wing lost twenty-five of fifty-three planes dispatched. Tom Jeffrey after the war noted that this mission ‘was one of the toughest, if not the toughest, flown in England by the Eighth Air Force during World War II’.

The target for the third of the Big Three was a strategic ball bearing plant at Schweinfurt, Germany on October 14. Lt. Col. Jeffrey was the command pilot, flying with the lead crew of Lt. Robert D. Brown. Bombing results were superb. The 390th received its second Distinguished Unit Citation and Jeffrey was awarded the Silver Star for his effective leadership as the 13th Wing Command Pilot. The 390th lost one aircraft, the entire Wing only two. All other Groups with 291 aircraft dispatched lost a total of 58 aircraft on the mission.When Lt. Col. Jeffrey returned to base after the Schweinfurt mission the 390th had lost 18 of its original 35 crews. Replacement crews arrived as needed and promptly trained under his supervision to enable us to operate effectively. Soon the combat strength of the Group was increased to 70 crews, with the responsibility for their training and that of our lead crews falling on the shoulders of our Deputy Group Commander.The 390th in its initial four months of operations was fortunate in losing in combat only one of its twelve original command and staff pilot officers.

Col. Wittan served as our Group Commander from March 1, 1943 until April 17, 1944 when he assumed command of the 13th Combat Wing, to which the 390th, 100th and 95th Groups were attached. Tom Jeffrey served as our Deputy Group Commander from the end of February, 1943 until May 9, 1944 when he was given command of the 100th. Col Frederick W. Ott was Group Commander of the 390th from May 15, 1944 until September 6, 1944; Col. Joseph A. Moller succeeded him as Commander thereafter until May 6, 1945. Wittan and Jeffrey each served in their respective command positions much longer than Ott and Moller collectively and should be given major credit for our outstanding contributions to the team effort of the 390th organization during World War II.

In May of 1944 General LeMay, then commander of the Third Division of Eighth Air Force Bombardment Groups, contacted Lt. Col. Jeffrey, offering him a choice of serving as Group Commander of the 95th Group or with the 100th. Jeffrey asked for a day to think over which command he preferred. The 95th was highly regarded, with a solid combat record. The 100th had had a series of tragic missions, with significant losses in crews and command personnel. Jeffrey saw an opportunity to make over the 100th into a better combat unit that would be beneficial to the Wing and war effort. If successful he would get more credit for a job-well-done than if he merely maintained the momentum of the 95th. He called General LeMay and indicated his preference to command the 100th. The General is reported to have replied: "I thought that is what you would say."

Jeffrey, now promoted to full Colonel as commanding officer of the 100th, worked diligently to reorganize its command and staff structure, to emphasize all aspects of crew training and to provide enthusiasm and expertise needed by both flying and ground support personnel. In a relatively short period of time the operational record of the 100th was substantially equal to that of the other Groups in the 13th Wing. He was highly regarded in his role as Group Commander.Several weeks prior to the end of hostilities in Europe Colonel Jeffrey was relieved of command of the 100th and assigned the role of deputy director of operations of the US Strategic Air Force in Paris and later as director of operations of US Air Forces in Europe when the Headquarters moved to Wiesbaden, Germany. 

In 1946 he served as deputy director of operations for the Air Training Command at Barksdale Field. He next was director of operations for the 47th Air Division, Walker Air Force Base, New Mexico; then chief of Strategic Weapons Systems Development, Air Research and Development Command; then attended the Air War College.Beginning in 1955 Colonel Jeffrey was assigned to the Pentagon where he served for three years as chief of development for the Armed Forces Special Weapons Project. For two years beginning in 1958 he served as director of operations and chief of staff of Joint Task Force 7, planning and participating in the atomic tests series in the Pacific Area. Then he went to the Industrial College of the Armed Forces at Fort McNair, D.C. Following this, he was selected by General LeMay and appointed by the Chief of Staff to become the Site Activation Task Force Commander in charge of construction of the first strategic missile unit in the Air Force, the 567th Atlas "E" Squadron, based at Fairchild AFB. 

He then became the Site Activation Task Force Commander to supervise construction of the Minuteman I missile wing at Minot AFB, North Dakota. In June of 1964 he was assigned to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base as assistant to the commander and than as vice commander, ASD. Thereafter, as a Major General and prior to his retirement, he served in the Office of the Secretary of Defense in Washington in several capacities allied with the Air Force projects.The 390th Bomb Group was fortunate in having General Jeffrey involved in putting together the initial personnel structure of the 390th Bomb Group at the Blythe Air Base during February and March of 1943, in overseeing the training of our combat crews and serving in the role model of a motivated and dedicated deputy commander. His knowledge of aircraft and their flight characteristics, military hardware, navigation, bombardment, anti-aircraft weapons, command pilot procedures, meteorology, military customs and a myriad of other topics was a pleasure to witness. He was a fixture at our combat mission briefings and made it a point to welcome crews as they returned from assigned targets.

As Deputy Group Commander of the 390th from its inception and for a span of fifteen months, thereafter, Tom Jeffrey deserves recognition as an unsung founding father of the 390th Bombardment Group.


AIR FORCE BIO:

                                           MAJOR GENERAL THOMAS S. JEFFREY JR.
 
                                                        Retired May 1, 1970.   

Major General Thomas Stanley Jeffrey Jr. was born in Arvonia, Va., in 1917. He graduated from Arvonia High School, in 1934 and graduated from Virginia Military Institute in 1938 with a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering and a reserve commission in the Field Artillery. 

Immediately upon graduation from the Virginia Military Institute, General Jeffrey entered flying school at Randolph Field, Texas, as an aviation cadet, where he received his pilot wings in 1939 after having completed the bombardment course. 

His first assignment after Kelly Field was Langley Field, Va., and after a few months he was transferred with a new unit to Puerto Rico. He participated in reconnaissance and mapping of many areas of Central and South America. 

General Jeffrey returned to the United States in 1942 and was assigned as squadron commander with the 34th Bombardment Group at Spokane, Wash. When the 390th Bombardment Group was activated at Blythe, Calif., he was assigned to the group. He led the 390th Group to England in 1943 and remained with it as deputy commander until May 1944. In May 1944 he was assigned to the 100th Bombardment Group as commanding officer where he remained in this capacity until just prior to the end of the war in Europe. 

During his tour in Europe, General Jeffrey flew 27 missions in B-17s and was awarded the Silver Star, Distinguished Flying Cross with four oak leaf clusters, Bronze Star Medal, Air Medal with three oak leaf clusters, Army Commendation Medal with oak leaf cluster, French Croix de Guerre and Polish Cross of Valor. He participated in the famous Schweinfurt bombing raid in October 1943 and the shuttle bombing missions to Russia. 

Just prior to the end of World War II, General Jeffrey was assigned as deputy director of operations of U.S. Strategic Air Force in Paris and later as director of operations of U.S. Air Forces in Europe when the Headquarters moved to Wiesbaden, Germany. 

Upon return to the United States in 1946, General Jeffrey went to Barksdale Field, La., as deputy director of operations for the Air Training Command and director of training aids requirements for the U.S. Air Force. He remained in this capacity with duty at Barksdale and Chanute Air Force Base, Ill., until 1950. During the period of 1950 - 1954, General Jeffrey was director of operations for the 47th Air Division, Walker Air Force Base, N.M., for two years; chief of Strategic Weapons System Development, Air Research and Development Command, for one year; and attended the Air War College. 

General Jeffrey next was assigned to the Pentagon where he served for three years as chief of development for the Armed Forces Special Weapons Project. In 1958 he joined joint Task Force-7 with Headquarters at Arlington Hall, Va., and acted as director of operations and chief of staff of that organization for two years during which time he planned and participated in the atomic tests series in the Pacific area in 1958. 

In August 1959, General Jeffrey went to the Industrial College of the Armed Forces at Fort McNair, D.C. He was selected as Site Activation Task Force commander of an ATLAS E Squadron located in the area around Spokane, Wash. In this capacity he was responsible for construction, missile installation, test and check of the squadron. He was awarded the Legion of Merit and was named Military Man of the Year in Spokane. When the squadron was operational, he was assigned as Site Activation Task Force commander of a Minuteman missile wing at Minot Air Force Base, N.D., with the same responsibilities. 

In June 1964 General Jeffrey was transferred to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio and served as assistant to the commander, and later as deputy for systems management, Headquarters Aeronautical Systems Division and in June 1966 was appointed vice commander, ASD. In October 1966 he was assigned to the Office of the Secretary of Defense (Installations and Logistics) as staff director for aircraft. In June 1967, he was appointed as director of production and programming, Deputy Chief of Staff, Systems and Logistics, Headquarters U.S. Air Force. 

(Current as of Jan. 15, 1968)

*************************************************************************************************************
MAJOR GENERAL THOMAS STANLEY JEFFREY, JR.

Thomas Stanley Jeffrey, Jr., Major General USAF, Retired, died March 14, 2008 at age 91.  General Jeffrey was born February 5, 1917 in Arvonia, Virginia, son of the late Thomas Stanley Jeffrey and Eleanor Morgan, and married to the late Helen Lucille Stewart.  

His long and distinguished military career began with his graduation from Virginia Military Institute in 1938 with a B.S. degree in electrical engineering.  Throughout his military career, he sought out and served in the most challenging command and staff positions.  Upon graduation from the Virginia Military Institute, he entered flying school at Randolph Field, Texas, where he received his pilot wings in 1939 after having completed the bombardment course.  Transferred with a new unit to Puerto Rico, he participated in reconnaissance and mapping of many areas of Central and South America. He returned to the United States in 1942 and was assigned as squadron commander with the 34th Bombardment Group at Spokane, Washington.  When the 390th Bombardment Group was activated in Blythe, California, he was assigned to the group.  He led the 390th Group to England in 1943 and remained with it as deputy commander until May 1944.  Missions flown with the 390th were Kiel, Vitry, Stuttgard, Emden, Schweinfurt, Munster, Quedix, Frankfurt, Brunswick, Chateau don, Dijon.  He was then assigned to the 100th Bombardment Group as commanding officer where he remained until just prior to the end of the war in Europe. Missions he led were Berlin, Abbyville, Caen, Dresden, Droboycz, Arad, Beziers, Munich, St. Lo, Troves, St. Sylvain, Evest, Mainz, Warsaw, and Szolnok.

During his tour in Europe, General Jeffrey flew 27 missions in B-17 bombers and was awarded the Silver Star, Distinguished Flying Cross with four oak leaf clusters, Bronze Star Medal, Air Medal with three oak leaf clusters, Army Commendation Medal with oak leaf cluster, French Croix de Guerre and Polish Cross of Valor.  He participated in the famous Schweinfurt bombing raid in October 1943 and the shuttle bombing missions to Russia.

Just prior to the end of World War II, he was assigned as deputy director of operations of U.S. Strategic Air Force in Paris and later as director of operations of U.S. Air Forces in Europe when the Headquarters moved to Wiesbaden, Germany.

Upon return to the United States in 1946, he was assigned as deputy director of operations for the Air Training Command and director of training aids requirements for the U.S. Air Force at Barksdale Field, Louisiana.  He remained in this capacity with duty at Chanute Air Force Base, Illinois until 1950. Between 1950 and 1954, he was director of operations for the 47th Air Division at Walker Air Force Base, New Mexico, chief of Strategic Weapons System Development, Air Research and Development Command, and he attended Air War College.

General Jeffrey was then assigned to the Pentagon where he served for three years as chief of development for the Armed Forces Special Weapons Project.  In 1958, he joined joint Task-Force-7 as director of operations and chief of staff for two years, during which time he planned and participated in the atomic tests series in the Pacific area.  In 1959, he attended the Industrial College of the Armed Forces at Ft. McNair.  Selected as Site Activation Task Force commander of an Atlas E Squadron located around Spokane, Washington, he was responsible for construction, missile installation, test and check of the squadron.  He was awarded the Legion of Merit and was named Military Man of the Year in Spokane.

When the squadron was operational, he was assigned as Site Activation Task Force commander of a Minuteman Missile Wing at Minot Air Force Base, North Dakota with the same responsibilities, where he was selected for promotion to Brigadier General.  In 1964, he became assistant to the commander, and later, deputy for systems management, Headquarters Aeronautical Systems Division at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, and in 1966, he was assigned to the Office of the Secretary of Defense (Installations and Logistics) as staff director for Aircraft.  He was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal.  In May of 1967, he was selected for promotion to Major General and was appointed as director of production and programming, Deputy Chief of Staff, Systems and Logistics, Headquarters USAF.  He retired to Arvonia, Virginia in 1970. There, he and his wife Helen enjoyed many happy years, helping neighbors in his rural hometown with every imaginable mechanical repair. 

General Jeffrey is survived by his son, Thomas Stanley Jeffrey III of Warrenton, Virginia, a daughter, Ann Morgan Jeffrey of Carbondale, Colorado, three grandchildren, Thomas Stanley Jeffrey IV and his wife Melissa, Ashley Jeffrey Groome and her husband Vince, Tyler Anderson Jeffrey, and four great-grandchildren, Jackson Adamy Jeffrey, Eleanor Stewart Jeffrey, Cameron Nicole Groome, and Harold Vincent Groome IV.  A memorial service will be held at Arvon Presbyterian Church on Tuesday, March 18 at 1:00 p.m. with burial at Arlington National Cemetery on April 22 at 3:00 p.m.  In lieu of flowers, the family suggests contributions be made to Capital Hospice, Development Office, 6565 Arlington Blvd, Suite 500, Falls Church, VA 22042, or Historic Buckingham, Inc., P. O. Box 152, Buckingham, VA 23921.  Arrangements are by Demaine Funeral Home, Springfield, Virginia.



Ann Jeffrey 

MEMO 2:

KIA / MIA / EVA / INT INFORMATION:

TARGET: DATE:  
AIRCRAFT: CAUSE:  

BURIAL INFORMATION

PLOT: ROW:  
GRAVE: CEMETERY:  

PHOTOS:

Colonel Thomas Jeffrey upon assuming command of the 100th in May, 1944. (Gen Jeffrey collection)

Col. Tom Jeffrey and Capt. Everett Blakely (100th Photo Archives) 

 Invitation to the 200 Mission Party. (Photo courtesy of Ernest Havecker and his family: Eileen Rosenthal and Jodi Womack.) 

 Col. Jeff at the home of his close friend Harry F. Cruver in 1995 

 The 200 Mission Party Invitation Photo courtesy of Coralie Burrell 

Maj Gen Thomas S. Jeffrey flew a total of 27 missions between his time with 390th BG and 100th Bomb Group. He kept the recorded on a piece of leather.  (Photo courtesy of Daughter Ann Jeffrey) 

100th Commanding Officer, Thomas Jeffrey, left, Glenn Miller is center.   (100th Photo Archives)

Glenn Miller and Thomas Jeffrey meeting before Glenn Miller's last concert.  Glenn Miller was MIA after his concert at Thrope Abbotts.

"First Day of Issue" of an air mail envelope showing Thomas Jeffrey, and Glenn Miller.   (100th Photo Archives)

Jack Kidd leaving the 100th. From left: Sammy Barr, Thomas Jeffrey, Kidd, Rosie Rosenthal and Sumner Reeder. The airman with back to camera is not identified.   (100th Photo Archives)

Silver Dollar on the Continent, Col Tom Jeffrey personal "Hack" (Photo Courtesy of Jack O'Leary)

From left: Horace Varian, Thomas Jeffrey, Group Commanding Officer, and William Utely. Photograph taken in May 1944. (100th Photo Archives)

Jack Kidd leaving the 100th - From left: Sammy Barr, Rosie, Thomas Jeffrey, Kidd, and Sumner Reeder. (Gen Kidd collection)

Silver Dollar in Hangar after new tail assembly and paintwork.  This was Col Tom Jeffrey's "hack" starting in late April 1945. 

 Thomas Jeffrey, Rick Erickson, Dave Tallichet, Robert "Rosie" Rosenthal, Charlie "Hong Kong" Wilson. 

 Glenn Miller with 100th personnel, including Thomas Jeffrey, third from left. (Photo courtesy of Ernie Havecker and his family: Eileen Rosenthal and Jodi Womack.) 

 "SILVER DOLLAR" LN-R 350th 232090. (100th Photo Archives) 

 Jack Kidd's departure from the 100th. Kidd Collection 

 Jack Kidd's departure from the 100th. Kidd Collection 

 Jack Kidd's departure from the 100th. Kidd Collection 

 Jack Kidd leaving the 100th (100th Photo Archives) 

Chaplains for 3rd Air Division. Teska, Phillips and then Lt Col Tom Jeffrey in the photo. 

 Tom Jeffrey on left Believe this is Col Jeffrey getting the Silver Star...MPF(100th Photo Archives) 

 From left: William Utley - Gnd Exec, F. E. Price, F. J. Sutterlin, and Thomas Jeffery. (100th Photo Archives) 

 John Bennett, left, congratulates Col. Thomas Jeffery, the 100th's Commanding Officer on the completion of a successful mission. "Rosie" (Rosenthal) defined a successful mission and "Milk Run" the same way - ".. if you got back the mission qualified on both counts." Detailed Information (100th Photo Archives) 

 Horace L. Varian, Group Adjutant, Wing Adjutant, General commanding Wing, and Thomas Jeffrey, Commanding Officer. (100th Photo Archives) 

Silver Dollar after repair of tail damage and repainting of nose Art.  This was Col Tom Jeffrey "Hack" 

 The Generals: No# 1, Gen. Kissner, 3rd Air Division Chief of Staff, No# 2, Thomas Jeffrey, Commander of the 100th, No# 3 Gen. Lee, Commander of Supply Forces - ETO, No# 4 Gen Littlejohn from Gen Lee's staff - the Major Gen to his left is not identified. (100th Photo Archives) 

 Lt. Col. Bouchard, Major Emberson, Lt. Gen. Doolittle, Major Thompson and Col. Jeffrey (100th Photo Archives) 

 

SERVED IN:

ID: 2571