Trivia Questions

 
(1) Which was the first 100th BG crew to complete a tour of duty?
(2) When was "Black Week"?
(3) Which of the following was a target during "Black Week"?
Berlin Regensburg
Bremen Brunswick
(4) Who was the first Commanding Officer of the 100th Bomb Group?
S. L. Barr J. M. Bennett
D. M. Alkire H. F. Cruver
(5) What was the date and target of the 100th's first combat mission in the ETO?
26 June 1943 - LeMans 25 June 1943 - Bremen
24 June 1943 - Berlin 23 June 1943 - Hamburg
(6) What was the date and target of the 100th's last combat mission in the ETO?
20 April 1945 - Oranienburg 18 April 1945 - Straubing
22 April 1945 - Aussig 17 April 1945 - Aussig
(7) Who was the pilot of Piccadilly Lily
Alvin Barker Henry Rosine
Marshall Lee Thomas Murphy
(8) What was the name of the aircraft that was involved in the "gear down" incident?
Aw-R-Go Bigass Bird II
Phatzac Picklepuss
(9) The 100th flew relief missions after the end of hostilities. What were these missions called?
Operation Food Operation Relief
Chowhound Relief
(10) Who was the pilot that crashed into Draper's barn with the Red Cross girls?
"Crankshaft" Cruikshank "Big Frank" Valesh
"The Chief" Moreno "Buzz" Fitzroy
(11) What crew brought the famous donkey back from North Africa?
Bob Wolff Frank Malooly
John Brady "Cowboy" Roane
(12) Refer to question #11. What was the donkey's name?
Moe Donkey
Larry Oscar
(13) The 100th received Distinguished (Presidential) Unit Citations for what missions?
Bremen and Marienburg Regensburg and Berlin
Bremen and Schweinfurt Marienburg and Regensburg
(14) Which was the only crew to return from the Munster mission of 10 October 1943?
John Brady Robert Rosenthal
Winton MacCarter Edward Stork
(15) In 1943, the average life of an 8th Air Force B-17 crew was how many missions?
25 35
11 17
(16) Which of the following was one of the first 100th aircraft destroyed in action?
Salvo Sal Phartzac
Angel's Tit Marie Helena
(17) Refer to question #16. Who was the pilot?
Alonzo P. Adams Raymond J. Gormley
Frank H. Meadows Thomas E. Murphy
(18) How many times did Lt. Col. John Bennett serve as commander of the 100th Bomb Group?
0 1
3 2
(19) How many aircraft did the 100th lose over Berlin on 8 Mar 44?
1 15
7 13
(20) What was the name of "Cowboy" Roane's aircraft? (2 correct answers)
Randi Lou Piccadilly Lily
Bigassbird II Laiden Maden
(21) Who was the 418th Bomb Squadron's Engineering Officer?
Bill Clift Mack McCarty
Red Bowman Horace Varian
(22) How many aircraft did "Big Frank" Valesh bring back damaged?
8 5
7 3
(23) Who was in charge of Group Engineering?
Butch Rovegno Donald Blazer
Bill Carlton Bill Clift
(24) Who in the Group was awarded the first Distinguished Service Cross?
Sumner Reeder Robert Rosenthal
Gale Cleven John Bennett
(25) Which member of the 100th owns his very own B-17 today?
David Tallichet "Hong Kong" Wilson
Bill Kennedy Glenn Rojohn
(26) Who was the first Commanding Officer of the 351st Bomb Squadron?
H. F. Cruver C. B. Emberson
J. B. Kidd J. B. Milling
(27) How many combat missions did the 100th fly?
306 305
307 301
(28) How many 100th aircraft were destroyed in action?
169 170
189 190
(29) How many enemy aircraft were destroyed by the 100th?
291.5 290
283.5 260
(30) Who were the pilots involved in the famous "Piggy Back" incident?
Leslie Roediger and Winton MacCarter Glenn Rake and Edward McKay
Glenn Rojohn and William McNab Frederick Ricci and Dale McEwen
(31) Thorpe Abbotts was the 100th's home in England. What was the station number?
139 149
129 119
(32) In September 1943, what was the normal crew compliment of a B-17?
8 9
10 11
(33) In March 1945, what was the normal crew compliment of a B-17?
9 8
10 11
(34) What crew position did the regular Co-Pilot occupy when a Command Pilot was on board?
Nose Gunner Bombardier
Tail Gunner Co-Pilot
(35) Which 100th pilot was the first to crash land on English soil with no crew injuries?
John Brady "Big Frank" Valesh
Glenn Dye John Luckadoo
(36) Which 100th BG aircraft took the most damage and still landed safely?
Piccadilly Lily Royal Flush
Miss Irish Hang The Expense
(37) Refer to question #36. Who was the pilot?
Robert "Rosie" Rosenthal Frank Valesh
John Gibbons Gale "Bucky" Cleven
(38) Who flew with the 100th and later wrote "Twelve O'clock High" and "Strategic Air Command"?
Chick Harding Bernie Lay
Bucky Cleven Ernest Gann
(38) What well known 100th pilot began his flying career with the Royal Canadian Air Force?
Glenn Rojohn Neal P. Scott
Harry A. Nelson Charles "Hong Kong" Wilson
(39) Which 100th pilot is thought to be the first 8th Air Force pilot to nurse a B-17 back on just one engine?
Glenn Van Noy John Brady
Arthur Becktoft Edward Stork
(40) Six men in the 100th received the Distinguished Service Cross. 
For which mission were three of these medals awarded
Regensburg - 17 Aug 1943 Stuttgart - 6 Sep 1943
Ludwigshafen - 30 Dec 1943 Berlin - 3 Feb 1943
(41) Refer to the question above (#40). Who were these three men?
Dean Radtke, Robert Reilly, William Agnetti Robert Rosenthal, John Ernst, Louis Chappel
Sumner Reeder, Harry Edeburn, Russel Engle Gale Cleven, Ken Blair, Don Strout
(42) A 100th BG pilot flew the Enola Gay after the war. Who was this airman?
Hint: He was original 100th and arrived in England as CP on the Glenn W. Dye crew.
Harry A. Nelson Alonzo P. Adams
Thomas S. Jeffrey John H. Luckadoo
(43) How many copilots of the original 100th successfully completed 25 combat missions?
34 14
4 24
(44) Which was the last crew lost by the 100th BG (10 Apr 44 - Burg-bei-Magdeburg)?
Richard B. Atchison, Jr. Lawrence L. Bazin
Delbert D. Reeve George W. Brannan

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Medals & Decorations


Distinguished Service Cross
 

The Distinguished Service Cross, section 3742, title 10, United States Code (10 USC 3742), was established by Act of Congress 9 July 1918 (amended by act of 25 July 1963).
The Distinguished Service Cross is awarded to a person who while serving in any capacity with the Army, distinguished himself or herself by extraordinary heroism not justifying the award of a Medal of Honor; while engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States; while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing or foreign force; or while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing Armed Force in which the United States is not a belligerent party. The act or acts of heroism must have been so notable and have involved risk of life so extraordinary as to set the individual apart from his or her comrades.



Silver Star Medal
 

The Silver Star Medal, section 3746, title 10, United States Code (10 USC 3746), was established by Act of Congress 9 July 1918 (amended by act of 25 July 1963).
The Silver Star is awarded to a person who, while serving in any capacity with the U.S. Army, is cited for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force, or while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party. The required gallantry, while of a lesser degree than that required for the Distinguished Service Cross, must nevertheless have been performed with marked distinction.
It is awarded upon letter application to Commander, PERSCOM, ATTN: TAPC-PDA, Alexandria, VA 22332-0471, to those individuals who, while serving in any capacity with the U.S. Army, received a citation for gallantry in action in World War I published in orders issued by a headquarters commanded by a general officer.



Distinguished Flying Cross
 

The Distinguished Flying Cross, section 3749, title 10, United States Code (10 USC 3749), was established by Act of Congress 2 July 1926.
The Distinguished Flying Cross is awarded to any person who, while serving in any capacity with the Army of the United States, distinguished himself or herself by heroism or extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight. The performance of the act of heroism must be evidenced by voluntary action above and beyond the call of duty. The extraordinary achievement must have resulted in an accomplishment so exceptional and outstanding as to clearly set the individual apart from his or her comrades or from other persons in similar circumstances. Awards will be made only to recognize single acts of heroism or extraordinary achievement and will not be made in recognition of sustained operational activities against an armed enemy.



Purple Heart Medal
 

The Purple Heart Medal was established by General George Washington at Newburgh, New York, on 7 August 1782, during the Revolutionary War. It was reestablished by the President of the United States per War Department General Orders 3, 1932 and is currently awarded pursuant to Executive Order 11016, 25 April 1962, Executive Order 12464, 23 February 1984 and Public Law 98-525, 19 October 1984.
The Purple Heart is awarded in the name of the President of the United States to any member of an Armed Force or any civilian national of the United States who, while serving under competent authority in any capacity with one of the U.S. Armed Services after 5 April 1917, has been wounded or killed, or who has died or may hereafter die after being wounded.



Presidential Unit Citation
 

The 100th Bomb Group received this citation twice. The first award was for the Regensburg mission of 17 Aug 1943. The second award was for the Berlin missions of 4, 6 and 8 Mar 1944.
1. Description: The Presidential Unit Citation emblem worn to represent award of the Presidential Unit Citation is 1 7/16 inches wide and 9/16 inch in height. The emblem consists of a 1/16 inch wide Gold frame with laurel leaves, which encloses an Ultramarine Blue 67118 ribbon.
2. Criteria: The Presidential Unit Citation is awarded to units of the Armed Forces of the United States and co-belligerent nations for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy occurring on or after 7 December 1941. The unit must display such gallantry, determination, and esprit de corps in accomplishing its mission under extremely difficult and hazardous conditions as to set it apart and above other units participating in the same campaign. The degree of heroism required is the same as that which would warrant award of a Distinguished Service Cross to an individual. Extended periods of combat duty or participation in a large number of operational missions, either ground or air is not sufficient. This award will normally be earned by units that have participated in single or successive actions covering relatively brief time spans. It is not reasonable to presume that entire units can sustain Distinguished Service Cross performance for extended time periods except under the most unusual circumstances. Only on rare occasions will a unit larger than battalion qualify for award of this decoration.
3. Components: The components of the Presidential Unit Citation are the emblem awarded to members of the unit and the streamer for display on the unit flag/guidon.
a. Presidential Unit Citation emblem: MIL-D-3943/32 (frame) and MIL-R-11589/54 (ribbon). NSN 8455-00-257-3875.
b. Streamer: MIL-S-14650/5. Manual requisition in accordance with Chapter 9, Army Regulation (AR) 840-10.
4. Background: a. The Distinguished Unit Citation was established as a result of Executive Order No. 9075, dated 26 February 1942. The Executive Order directed the Secretary of War to issue citations in the name of the President of the United States to Army units for outstanding performance of duty after 7 December 1941. The design submitted by the Office of the Quartermaster General was approved by the G1 on 30 May 1942.
b. The Distinguished Unit Citation was redesignated the Presidential Unit Citation (Army) per DF, DCSPER, date 3 November 1966.
c. The emblem is worn by all members of a cited organization and is considered an individual decoration for persons in connection with the cited acts and may be worn whether or not they continue as members of the organization. Other personnel may wear this decoration while serving with an organization to indicate the unit has been awarded the Presidential Unit Citation.
d. Order of precedence and wear policy for unit awards is contained in Army Regulation (AR) 670-1. Policy for awards, approving authority, and supply of the unit award emblem is contained in AR 600-8-22. The policy for display of unit awards on guidons and flags and supply of streamers is contained in AR 840-10.



Air Medal
 

The Air Medal was established by Executive Order 9158, 11 May 1942 as amended by Executive Order 9242-A, 11 September 1942. The Air Medal is awarded to any person who, while serving in any capacity in or with the U.S. Army, will have distinguished himself or herself by meritorious achievement while participating in aerial flight. Awards may be made to recognize single acts of merit or heroism, or for meritorious service as described below.
Awards may be made for acts of heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy or while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party, which are of a lesser degree than required for award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.
Awards may be made for single acts of meritorious achievement, involving superior airmanship, which are of a lesser degree than required for award of the Distinguished Flying Cross, but nevertheless were accomplished with distinction beyond that normally expected.
Awards for meritorious service may be made for sustained distinction in the performance of duties involving regular and frequent participation in aerial flight for a period of at least 6 months. In this regard, accumulation of a specified number of hours and missions will not serve as the basis for award of the Air Medal. Criteria in paragraph c above, concerning conditions of conflict, are applicable to award of the Air Medal for meritorious service.
Award of the Air Medal is primarily intended to recognize those personnel who are on current crewmember or non-crewmember flying status which requires them to participate in aerial flight on a regular and frequent basis in the performance of their primary duties. However, it may also be awarded to certain other individuals whose combat duties require regular and frequent flying in other than a passenger status, or individuals who perform a particularly noteworthy act while performing the function of a crewmember, but who are not on flying status as prescribed in AR 600-l06. These individuals must make a discernible contribution to the operational land combat mission or to the mission of the aircraft in flight. Examples of personnel whose combat duties require them to fly include those in the attack elements of units involved in air/land assaults against an armed enemy and those directly involved in airborne command and control of combat operations. Involvement in such activities, normally at the brigade/group level and below, serves only to establish eligibility for award of the Air Medal; the degree of heroism, meritorious achievement or exemplary service determines who should receive the award. Awards will not be made to individuals who use air transportation solely for the purpose of moving from point to point in a combat zone.



Prisoner of War Medal
 

The Prisoner of War Medal is issued only to those U.S. military personnel who were taken prisoner and held captive after 5 April 1917:
(1) While engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States;
(2) While engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or
(3) While serving with friendly forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing force in which the United States is not a belligerent party.



European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal
 

The European-African-Middle Eastern (EAME) Campaign Medal was awarded to personnel for service within the European-African-Middle Eastern Theater between 7 December 1941 and 8 November 1945 under any of the following conditions:
(1) On permanent assignment.
(2) In a passenger status or on temporary duty for 30 consecutive days or 60 days not consecutive.
(3) In active combat against the enemy and was awarded a combat decoration or furnished a certificate by the commanding general of a corps, higher unit, or independent force that he actually participated in combat.
The western boundary of EAME Theater is from the North Pole, south along the 75th meridian west longitude to the 77th parallel north latitude, then southeast through Davis Strait to the intersection of the 40th parallel north latitude and the 35th meridian west longitude, then south along the meridian to the 10th parallel north latitude, then southeast to the intersection of the Equator and the 20th meridian west longitude, then along the 20th meridian west longitude to the South Pole. The eastern boundary of the EAME Theater is from the North Pole south along the 60th meridian east longitude to its intersection with the east boundary of Iran, then south along the Iran boundary to the Gulf of Oman and the intersection of the 60th meridian east longitude, then south along the 60th meridian east longitude to the South Pole. The EAME Theater included Europe, European Russia, Greenland, Iceland, Africa, Iran, Iraq, and Turkey.



WW II Victory Medal
 

The WW II Victory Medal was awarded to all military personnel for service between 7 December 1941 and 31 December 1946.