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Personnel

Maj

John C. "Bucky" EGAN

Army Serial Number: O-399510
Assigned to the 100th Bombardment Group
Location: Gowen Field
Unit: 418th Bombardment Squadron
Rank: Major
Position: Command Pilot Position
Beginning Date of 100th Service: October 27, 1942
Time of Service at Thorpe Abbotts: May 1, 1943 - October 10, 1943

Aircraft

Serial #: 42-30830
Name: M'lle Zig Zig

M'lle Zig Zig

M'lle Zig Zig on October 10, 1943 Munster Mission

Other Associated Aircraft

Additional 100th Service Notes

Status: POW
MACR: 01029
CR: 01029
Comments: 10 OCT 43 MUNSTER (EAC - FLAK) AIR EXEC & 418TH CO

Awards and Commendations (in the order received)

Distinguished Flying Cross

Air Medal

Media Articles

Use your thumb to scroll through the results box below.

Media ItemTypePageVolume/IssueBroadcast SourceTimeDescriptionFile
John Egan and MuggsPrintManitowac Herald Times July 27 194312:00 am
John-Egan-and-Muggs-Manitowoc-Herald-Times-July27-1943-p-13.jpeg
William Veal, John Kidd, John Egan DFC by LeMay photoPrintStandard Star Nov 15 194312:00 am
Beirne Lay describes bravery of John Egan, Gale ClevenPrintThe Idaho Statesman Oct 31 194312:00 am

Comments and Notes

Memo 1:
MAJ. JOHN CLARENCE EGAN SERVED THE 100TH BOMB GROUP AS ITS FIRST AIR EXECUTIVE AND LATER AS COMMANDER OF THE 418TH BOMB SQUADRON.  

Major John C. Egan – World War II Timeline

March 29 - August 30, 1940 - Flying Cadet Randolph Field TX - (with Gale Cleven and Ollen Turner)
September 9 - November 14, 1940 - Flying Cadet, Kelly Field TX -( With Gale Cleven, Ollen Turner)
November 15, 1940 - Kelly Field, promoted from Flying Cadet to 2nd Lieutenant ACR ( Air Corp Reserve) -( Egan, Cleven and Ollen Turner)
November 15, 1940 - March 3, 1941 - 2nd Lieutenant ACR
March 4, 1941 - April 24, 1942 - 2nd Lieutenant ACR
April 25, 1942- Promoted to 1st Lieutenant, AC (Gale Cleven, John Egan and William Veal)
May 25, 1942 - McDill AAF, 29th Bombardment Group, Lt John Egan, Lt Gale Cleven Lt William Veal Instructors
August 1942- Promoted to Captain
October 1942- Gowan Field Army Air Field , Boise Idaho, Operations Officer for 100th Bomb Group (H)
November 1942-Walla Walla AAF, WA
December 1942- Wendover AAF
January 1943 - Promoted to Major, Sioux City, Iowa
Feb-April 1943-Kearny Nebraska
March 1943 - Cross country flight fiasco and Col Darr Alkire is relieved of command
May 1943 - Egan travels with advance party to England, Podington to prepare base for 100th BG
May 19, 1943- Flies a mission with Lt McDaniel from 305th Bomb Group at Chelveston
May 21, 1943- Flies a mission with Lt McDaniel from 305th Bomb Group at Chelveston
May 23, 1943- Flies Training Mission with Capt L. C. Smith
June 1943 - Major John C Egan takes over command of 418th Bomb Squadron
October 10, 1943 - Shot down while leading the mission to Munster
October 1943 – April 1945 POW-Stalag Luft III

EGAN FLEW THE MUNSTER MISSION ON OCTOBER 10, 1943 WITH THE JOHN BRADY CREW AND BECAME A POW. EGAN AND CLEVEN (“THE TWO BUCKIES”) WERE LOST WITHIN A TWO DAY PEROID; CLEVEN WITH DeMARCO AT BREMEN (8 OCT 1943) AND EGAN AT MUNSTER WITH BRADY.

IN AN INTERVIEW WITH BUCK CLEVEN (JAN 2001), HE REVEALED THAT HE AND EGAN WERE ROOMATES THROUGHOUT FLYING SCHOOL. IN FACT, IT WAS EGAN WHO GAVE GALE CLEVEN HIS NICKNAME “BUCK”. MAJ EGAN HAD A FRIEND IN WISCONSIN THAT WAS NAMED BUCK WHO LOOKED EXACTLY LIKE CLEVEN. EVERYTIME EGAN INTRODUCED CLEVEN TO PEOPLE, HE SAID \"HERE IS MY FRIEND "BUCK" CLEVEN. CLEVEN SAID THAT EVEN THOUGH HE DID NOT LIKE IT, THE NICKNAME STUCK AND FROM THAT POINT ON, HE WAS “BUCK” CLEVEN. CLEVEN SAID THAT JOHN WAS A QUITE PERSON WHO WAS QUICK WITTED AND A GOOD DRINKER -- A VERY LIKEABLE INDIVIDUAL. BOTH OF THEM SPENT TIME IN SEBRING FLYING B-24 SUBMARINE PATROLS. JOHN ALSO BOUGHT HIS FAMOUS FLEECE LINED FLYING JACKET WHILE TRAINING PILOTS AT SAN ANGELO, TX. THE JACKET WAS ARMY AIR CORPS ISSUE AND WAS BEING DISCONTINUED. JOHN LOVED THAT JACKET AND IS SEEN IN MOST PICTURES WEARING IT, HOWEVER CLEVEN THOUGHT IT ALWAYS LOOKED DIRTY. BOTH MEN REMAINED CLOSE FRIENDS AFTER THE WAR, UNFORTUNATELY JOHN PASSED AWAY FROM A HEART ATTACK IN 1961 AT THE AGE OF 45.

Additional Remembrances from Gale “Buck” Cleven: POW experience on the Mooseburg march -

“During the march to Mooseburg from Stalag Luft III, we came to a rest in a building used by Polish and Russian Slave labor, the straw mattress on the bunks were so infested with bugs they could have moved by themselves. We burned the straw mattress’s and then washed down the concrete building with cold water. Now come night time this building was damp and cold and we only had one blanket each and had to sleep on cold springs. Well that night, John Egan came up to me and said “Buck, I think there are some strange things going on in this camp”, to which I replied he was crazy. Later he was on the lower bunk and I was on the upper bunk on metal springs and one blanket and the building was getting awfully cold. John says to me, “Buck, can I climb up into your bunk, and my reply was “John, I think there are strange things going on in this camp!”

Egan at Stalag Luft III

After Egan was shot down over Munster (led the mission to avenge his frind Gale Cleven being shot down two days earlier) and arrived at Stalag Luft III, the first thing Cleven said to Egan was “What the Hell took you so Long” and he replied, “That's what I get for being sentimental”! John was my roommate in Primary pilot training, we were Squadron Commanders in the same group and roommates in POW camp.

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Missions of Maj. John Egan
(Note: According to records, Maj Egan flew 16 missions with the 100th Bomb Group. Mpf records 2001)

On May 21st 1943, Major John Egan became the first member of the 100th to participate in a combat mission, when he flew with the 305th Bomb Group. Egan had initially been reported missing but fortunately came through a rough mission and his plane landed safely at a station different from the one he left.

May 19, 1943- Flies a mission with Lt McDaniel from 305th Bomb Group at Chelveston

May 21, 1943- Flies a mission with Lt McDaniel from 305th Bomb Group at Chelveston


DATE TARGET A/C # & NAME

1. 04/07/43 LaPALLICE 23237 STYMIE
2. 10/07/43 LeBOURGET 230061 JUST-A-SNAPPIN
3. 25/07/43 KIEL 230061 JUST-A-SNAPPIN
4. 17/08/43 REGENSBURG 230066 MUGWUMP
5. 31/08/43 MEULAN Les MERUEAUX 23393 JUST-A-SNAPPIN
6. 06/09/43 STUTTGART 23393 JUST-A-SNAPPIN
7. 09/09/43 ARTH 23393 JUST-A-SNAPPIN
8. 10/10/43 MUNSTER 230830 M’lle ZIG ZIG (WITH LT JOHN BRADY CREW)


1ST LT JOHN D. BRADY P POW 10 OCT 43 MUNSTER
MAJ. JOHN C. EGAN COM P POW 10 OCT 43 MUNSTER
2ND LT JOHN L. HOERR CP; POW 10 OCT 43 MUNSTER
2ND LT DAVID SOLOMAN NAV POW 10 OCT 43 MUNSTER
2ND LT HOWARD B. HAMILTON BOM; POW 10 OCT 43 MUNSTER
S/SGT ADOLPH BLUM TTE; POW 10 OCT 43 MUNSTER
S/SGT HAROLD E. CLANTON WG; KIA 10 OCT 43 MUNSTER
T/SGT JOSEPH E. HAFER ROG POW 10 OCT 43 MUNSTER
PVT ROLAND D. GANGWER BTG; POW 10 OCT 43 MUNSTER
S/SGT JAMES A. McCUSKER WG; POW 10 OCT 43 MUNSTER
S/SGT GEORGE J. PETROHELOS TG; POW 10 OCT 43 MUNSTER

NOTES:

CREW #32 LED THE 10 OCT 43 MISSION AND MAJ JOHN C. EGAN, THE 418TH CO, FLEW IN THE CO-PILOT’S SEAT. NEAR THE I.P. “MLLE ZIG ZIG” WAS HIT BY FLAK KILLING SGT CLANTON AND BADLY WOUNDING HOWARD HAMILTON AND ROLAND GANGWER. THE SURVIVING CREW MEMBERS SUCCEEDED IN BAILING OUT AND WERE TAKEN PRISONER. HAMILTON AND GANGWER SPENT A LONG TIME IN THE HOSPITAL.

*******************************************************************

Recollections of Capt. John D. Brady:

Munster Raid: “This hazy recollection is reinforced by an equally hazy recollection of a very brief discussion with Egan as to whether we should all return to base. We both made the sign of the cross and plunged forward to our unhappy rendezvous. Everything hit the fan as soon as the Spitfires turned back and by the time we arrived at the I.P. disaster was upon us. The net result, and I do mean net, was that Rosie was the only 100th plane to return to Thorpe Abbotts.”

“Gene Clanton, waist gunner, was killed by flak a few minutes before the final hit and went down with the plane. Roland Gangwer, ball turret gunner, and Howard Hamilton, bombardier were both wounded but jumped with the rest of the crew. Egan and I did the “after you” act in the bomb bay until a circling German fighter lobbed another shell into the fuselage at which time we dove out simultaneously. On the ground we had different experiences. Egan managed to remain free for several days before being picked up.”


*******************************************************************

HEADQUARTERS

UNITED STATES AIR FORCE
WASHINGTON

18 APRIL 1961

SUBJECT: FUNERAL SERVICE

TO: ALL MILITARY PERSONNEL, HEADQUARTERS USAF

1. Requiem Mass for the late Colonel John C. Egan, 3781A, USAF, Will be held at 1000 hours, 19 April 1961 in the Fort Myer Chapel. Internment will follow in Arlington National Cemetery with military honors. Friends who desire to view Colonel Egan may call at the Administration Building, Arlington National Cemetery at 0930 hours on 19 April 1961.

2. Colonel Egan was born in Manitowoc, Wisconsin on 9 September 1915. He entered the Army Air Corps in March 1940, graduating from pilot training as a Second Lieutenant on 15 November 1940. During World War II he served in the European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign and was a Prisoner of War in Germany. During the Korean conflict he was assigned duties in FEAF. During World War II and the Korean conflict he was credited with eighteen combat missions. In August of 1957 he returned from duties in the Far East and attended the National War College, Washington D.C. In July 1958, he was assigned duties in the Hq USAF as Chief, Policy Division, Directorate of Plans, DCS/Personnel. Colonel Egan was promoted to his present grade in August 1951 and was awarded the rating of Command Pilot on 14 November 1955. He received a Bachelor of Science Degree from Georgetown University, Washington D.C. For his military service Colonel Egan was presented the following awards and decorations: Distinguished Flying Cross; Air Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters; Commendation Medal; Purple Heart; Distinguished Unit Citation; American Defense Service Medal; American Campaign Medal; European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal; WWII Victory Medal; National Defense Service Medal; United Nations Service Medal; Air Force Longevity Service Medal with three bronze Oak Leaf Clusters; Korean Service Medal; China Service Medal and Korean Pilot Wings.

3. Colonel Egan is survived by his wife, Mrs Josephine A. Egan and two daughters of 4307 Crestwood Lane, McLean, Virginia.

4. Flowers are graciously declined. Contributions may be made to the Heart Fund.

R.J. Pugh
Colonel, USAF
Deputy Director of Administrative Services

*******************************************************************

John C. Egan (Post-War Summary)

Following Egan’s return from Europe in early-summer 1945, Egan initially requested to be sent to the Pacific theater should they still need B-17 pilots; however he remained stateside. Egan married Josephine Pitz on December 26, 1945 in their hometown of Manitowoc, Wisconsin. Egan’s friends from the 100th Bomb Group - Buck Cleven (and wife Marjorie) and Bernard DeMarco were in attendance. During WWII, Josephine served as a Women Airforce Service Pilot (WASP) and had been the first female licensed pilot in the city of Manitowoc. Egan graduated from Georgetown University in 1948, and was promoted to the rank of full Colonel in 1951.

During the Korean War, Egan was commander of the 67th Reconnaissance Group, 5th Air Force in Korea. While in Korea, he flew B-26 bombers in close support missions against North Korean ground forces. Egan later became director of operations for the Pacific Air Force while stationed in Hawaii in 1956. Since 1958, Egan was assigned to the Pentagon working on a classified project. Egan died of a heart attack on April 16, 1961 while still on active duty and he is buried at Arlington National Cemetery. Multiple veterans from the 100th Bomb Group were present at the funeral service at Arlington, including Egan’s friends William Veal, John Brady, and Gale Cleven. Egan was survived by his wife and two daughters.

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Vail Daily
By Ali Longwell
Jan 25, 2024

Unpacking history

Annie Egan and her sister, Katy Park, with Austin Butler who plays Gale ‘Buck’ Cleven in ‘Masters of the Air.’ Cleven was their father’s close friend.
Annie Egan/Courtesy Photo
Annie Egan has lived in Eagle County for 30 years, but for the first years of her life, she had a typical military child upbringing. Egan was born in Virginia, but her family also lived in Japan and Hawaii during her childhood. Ultimately, they settled back home in Virginia when her father was stationed at the Pentagon.

However, Egan never really got to know her father. John Egan died suddenly in 1961 from a heart attack at age 45 — she was 11 at the time.

“I loved and adored him,” Egan said. “My fondest memory about my dad was when he would come home from the Pentagon, we would go downstairs to the dry bar, he would fix himself a whiskey and we would play gin rummy.”

Egan’s mother also served in the war as a pilot with WASP (Women’s Air Force Service Pilot), “ferrying planes from the manufacturers to the East Coast where the men took them overseas for battle,” she said. The couple met in their hometown of Manitowoc, Wisconsin after the war and married in 1945.

Both before and after her father’s passing, Egan never knew and heard much about her father’s service in the war: “Those men didn’t talk about what they went through; it was so awful,” she remarked.

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Then, about 10 years ago, Egan and her sister, Katy Park, were contacted by historians from the 100th Bomb Group Foundation, who got in touch about the “Masters of the Air” show.

“We were contacted by Mike Faley, one of the historians (with the foundation), who left a message on my phone saying, ‘I’m looking for the daughters of Major John Egan from the war’ — he was a colonel when he passed away, but back in the 40s he was a major,” Egan said. “They wanted to know what we had.”

The sisters shared what artifacts they had — including medals, his fez hat and other items — with the foundation, but it also started Egan on a journey of learning about her father’s involvement in the war.

“That’s when I took interest in the war,” she said.

It hasn’t been easy. Even today, Egan has a hard time hearing about the conditions that her father and the other men endured.

“What these men went through is incomprehensible. They were in these airplanes that were just a shell, they didn’t have any insulation at all, and they’re flying up at 20,000 feet so frostbite was rampant … it was really horrendous what they went through,” she said.


John Clarence “Bucky” Egan was a pilot in the 418th Bomb Squadron, 100th Bomb Group. Egan is one of the main characters in a new show telling the story of the group in World War II.
The 100th Bomb Group Foundation/Courtesy Photo
However, there are some silver linings. Through this experience, Egan has learned a bit more about her father.

“I learned that I got my personality from my dad because he was a little wild and crazy,” she said. “He had that fun personality. People were drawn to him not only because of his sense of humor but because he demanded respect. He was very good at what he did.”

One of the stories Egan learned is that her father took a demotion at one point “because he wanted to be closer to the guys, he didn’t want to be sitting on the ground, he wanted to fly.”

And, among the stories that made it into the show, Egan recalled one in particular that shows the bond, loyalty and sense of humor between her father and Cleven.

“(Cleven) was shot down two days before my dad was. And my dad was so pissed off. He was like, ‘I’m flying in the next raid (an Oct. 10 raid on Münster),’ which was two days later,” Egan said. “That was where my dad was shot down, two days later. When they took him to the prison camp, Buck was at the fence and said, ‘What the hell took you so long?'”

Sharing the story
At the beginning of January, Egan and her sister were flown out to the show’s premiere, which Egan described as a “whirlwind.”

While there, the sisters got to meet Callum and Butler — but not, to Egan’s disappointment, Hanks — and watch the first episode of the show. The experience of the show, and learning about her father, has been bittersweet for Egan.

“It was exciting because it’s about my dad,” she said.

At the same time, “It’s upsetting for me because I didn’t get to know my daddy, and it makes me sad that I didn’t get to know him better,” she added, with tears in her eyes.

One of Egan’s friends from high school recently reached out and shared that the show is “an incredible tale of heroism in the face of utterly daunting odds — your dad was one brave SOB (that term meant as the highest possible compliment, I assure you).”

Egan agrees and ultimately, believes that the show is going to speak for itself.

“People, including myself, didn’t realize the conditions that these men were under, going out to fly, knowing that you probably won’t come back, that your chances of not coming are more than those of coming back,” she said. “It’s going to be an eye-opener.”
Memo 2:
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From the Archives…

Originally printed in: Vol, Number 4, Winter 1980
Splasher Six

ONE MAN AND HIS DOG
By John Archer

Editor’s Note: John Archer is a longtime British friend of the 100th and its veterans. Various articles by John have appeared in Splasher Six over the decades, and he continues to stay in touch with this Editor and likely with others of our group through cheerful cards and notes. The occasion of John’s Christmas greetings spurred me to re-read some of his stories. First written at Christmastime, 1976 and published in The Diss Express (Diss, England), Harry Crosby reprinted it in Splasher Six, Winter 1980 issue. In early October 1943 when missions were tough and losses were heavy, 100th BG legend Major John Egan had the following memorable encounter.

The Major was a lean, dark young man with a wisp of moustache. He was 27, but looked older. He could turn on the charm and turn it off whenever he liked. It’s the kind of thing one experiences in foreman of construction gangs and traffic managers at airports, in jobs where contact and participation with the men is the prime factor.

Major Egan was involved in the case of “Meatball vs the Pullet” a few days before he went down on a raid over Germany. Now Meatball was a half-grown husky dog which the crew of the B-17 brought over from Labrador on their way to Thorpe Abbotts during the summer of 1943. It seemed that Meatball was a bad dog, and all of a sudden turned into a chicken killer. And when did he decide to become a chicken killer? At a time when the personnel were involved in the toughest flying missions the group had yet undertaken. Deep raids as far as Danzig against desperate opposition.

And in this tense atmosphere Meatball got playful one morning and mangled a chicken dead. The nearby farmer went bustling up to the orderly room to see the Major. Major Egan was sitting in with his pilots having an informal briefing with the men about new tactics in aerial combat. It was the afternoon following a raid on Emden, October 3, 1943.

The farmer from down the road described “a light brown dog” that had killed a pullet. “Light brown. That’s Meatball, all right,” said the Major. “And you say he got a pullet?” asked the Major sympathetically. “Well, a pullet is pretty important, isn’t it?”
“It is,” said the farmer, calming down by this time. Where did you ever hear of a Major who knew anything about pullets, and what is more, who would talk about loss sympathetically in the middle of a grim military operation? Clearly the Major was now pulling out the charm act. He could, of course, have turned the whole matter of Meatball, pullet and payment over to the Adjutant. But the affair seemed right down the Major’s alley. All the new crews who had just arrived at Thorpe Abbotts were by that time listening with amazement.

“That pullet, did she look like a layer?” asked the Major. You could see by his face that he was rather tired, after all, it was only an hour or so since the raid was over.
“She did, Sir, for a fact,” said the farmer.
“Well, what would you say she’s worth?” asked the Major.
“Twenty bob,” said the farmer.
“All right,” said the Major. “I think that’s a pretty reasonable sum for a good pullet, don’t you?” he inquired looking around at the crews who flew the big bombers. They looked at him quite dumbfounded, not quite figuring it out, and wondering who was pulling whose leg. And the Major was aware he had everyone right there in front of him. He was the actor and the rest were the audience. The farmer had departed by this time, very pleased, and the Major was rocking back and forth on his chair and looking around. And from the subject of the Germans using rockets and guns, the conversation was not on pullets.

One of the young officers piped up and remarked, “A pullet, isn’t that some kind of… a rooster… like…” The Major glared at him and the officer’s face grew red. By now the class was sitting quite quietly.

“A pullet,” said the Major patiently, “is a half-grown female chicken which lays a small egg with a very small yolk.” And he showed them just how big with his fingers. “Then,” continued the Major, “the machinery inside the pullet goes to work and all of a sudden – one fine day it lays an egg twice as big as the usual and it is no longer a pullet.” The briefing closed at that point.
A few days later, Major Egan said goodbye for the last time to Meatball before climbing into his B-17. On October 10th, during a raid on Munster, the Major became a guest of the German forces, spending the rest of the war in a prison camp.

There was a certain pub in Dickleburgh that missed Major Egan. Sometimes he drove down in a jeep and sang songs in the bar with the locals and Irish laborers. With the affair of Meatball and the pullet, and the grim task of flying missions, Major Egan rounds out into a real example of an American who once walked the lonely lanes at Thorpe Abbotts.

Egan served as Air Exec for the 100th, as Commander of the 418th Squadron, and on the Munster raid flew as Command Pilot on John Brady’s lead crew. After being shot down, all but one of Brady’s crew survived as POWs. Egan stayed in the USAF following the war, attaining the rank of Colonel before dying suddenly of a heart attack in 1961 at age of 45. He earned the respect of all with whom he served.

After it is all over and a man is gone, for good, it is difficult sometimes to think of him exactly as he was. Sometimes little incidents that seemed unimportant at the time begin to constitute his whole personality and his being – as in this remembrance of Major John Egan, a Squadron Commander of a B-17 Flying Fortress unit stationed at Thorpe Abbotts during World War II.

********************
Somewhere in England… (from 1943)


Today was a double anniversary – the anniversary of American independence (the 157th) and the anniversary of USAAF bombing operations against Axis-held Europe (the 1st).

Our Fortresses celebrated by providing Adolf Hitler with a not very safe or sane Fourth of July. Continuing the Eighth Air Force’s part in the campaign against the U-boat menace, they made the longest B 17 operational flight to date, hammering at the vital submarine base of La Pallice, on the West coast of Nazi-gripped France. There was a heavy concentration of well-placed bombs on the target. Port installations and shipping were hit. Considerable damage was done to one of the prime objectives – a U-boat lock just recently reconstructed by the Nazis after previous devastation by Eighth Air Force and RAF bombardments.

As on their last two precious exercises in precision bombing in the skies over the France that is temporarily Hitler’s, very sparse fighter opposition was encountered by the Forts. Most crewmen report seeing mostly just two or three Nazi fighters at one time, and these were described as “timid” and “battle shy”. One Hun plane was probably destroyed.

The Fortresses had to fight their way through barrages of intense flak to get to the target. They dropped their explosive cargoes, and returned home with the loss of just one ship.

In the 100th Group Fortress that carried Brigadier General O. A. Anderson on a bombing mission over Europe for the first time, a Major and a Sergeant participated in a sub-strato saga. The pilot of “Muggs” Major John C. Eagan, looking over his shoulder, saw a pair of feet dangling limply many inches above the floor of the top turret gun’s platform. The feet belonged to Technical Sergeant John Shay, whose oxygen hose had become disconnected. He had collapsed, and his head had caught between the turret and the gunsight, his hands still grasping the turret controls. Despite the fact that he was risking unconsciousness himself, Major Eagan climbed into the narrow turret, replaced the gunner’s oxygen supply, and narrowly missed death when the reviving man touched off the turret controls, setting the mechanism revolving. Both Major and Sergeant were sent spinning around, banging against the sides of the narrow passageway. By the time the pilot had stopped the whirling turret, the gunner had suffered a chip fracture of the hip bone, and Major Eagan was minus a sleeve. “I had visions of being ground up into one great meat ball,” he reflected after return to base, “but I’m going to miss that shirt – it was my Sunday best.”

KIA / MIA / EVA / INT Information:

Target:
Munster
Aircraft:
"Mlle Zig Zig" (42-30830)
Date:
1943-10-10
Cause:
EAC-FLAK

Photos

Crew List

1st Crew List

Use your thumb to scroll through the results box below.

Rank Name Pos Status
Maj EGAN, John C. COM POW
Capt BRADY, John D. P POW
Lt HOERR, John CP POW
Maj CROSBY, Harry H. NAV CPT
HAMILTON, Howard B. BOM POW
T/Sgt BLUM, Adolph (Adolf) TTE POW
T/Sgt HAFER, Joseph E. ROG POW
S/SGT LEVITT, Saul ROG RFS
Sgt GANGWER, Roland D. BTG POW
S/Sgt CLANTON, Harold WG KIA
S/Sgt MCCUSKER, James WG POW
S/Sgt PETROHELOS, George J. TG POW